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The Importance Of Removing Mould From Your Home

Mildewed walls with different sorts of mold (close-up shot)Mould is a problem. It’s not just something that appears on old food that can be removed from your home simply by throwing the food out. Mould has a tendency to grow in areas where it can’t be seen. It thrives on moisture and our homes provide plenty of it. Especially in rooms such as the kitchen and the bathroom, the constant presence of moisture allows for mould to find a home. But it’s important to keep it out of your home.

What’s so dangerous about mould? As Joe Cuhaj explains on TodaysHomeowner.com, the presence of mould in the home can lead to a number of negative health effects. He writes that although it often results in minor allergic reactions such as sniffling, watery eyes and sneezing, “some people are more sensitive than others and may experience a stronger reaction that can include difficulty breathing and asthma attacks.”

What is it about mould that causes breathing difficulty? “Several types of mould release toxic substances called mycotoxins,” explains Cuhaj, “Exposure to high concentrations of mycotoxins from Stachybotrys (a greenish-black green mould that grows on cellulose material such as wallpaper, cardboard, and wallboard) or Chaetomium (a white to gray colored mold found on decaying wood and water damaged drywall) may lead to more severe health issues including chronic bronchitis, heart problems, and bleeding lungs.”

So what can be done about preventing mould growth? The first step would be to control the amount of moisture that is present in your home. As we alluded to earlier, it’s practically impossible to avoid moisture altogether as cooking and bathing – two very common daily routines – require the use of water. Controlling moisture, however, includes looking for damage in your home that may be leading to leaks.

The absence of leak sources will be very helpful in keeping mould at bay. But to control moisture, it’s important to monitor your home’s humidity levels as well. According to Gerri Willis on CNN.com, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “recommend keeping the humidity level in your house below 50 percent.” She goes on to suggest that you “use an air conditioner during humid months.”

What else can be done to control humidity in the home? “Make sure to check the ventilation in the kitchen and the bathroom,” advises Willis, “Open a window or turn on a fan when showering. Do not carpet bathrooms and consider using mould inhibitors that can be added to paints. If you see moisture building up, act quickly and dry the area. If you have any water leaks, whether it is coming in through the roof, or from a pipe or the ground, patch it up immediately.”

How can mould be cleaned up? It all depends on the amount of mould and the size of the area that needs to be cleaned. “If the mould is limited to an area of less than 10 square feet, then you might be able to clean it up yourself,” informs Cuhaj, “Areas larger than that should be handled by a professional. If you decide to enlist a professional, make sure they are trained and experienced in mould cleanup.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we couldn’t agree more. Our Mould Assessment Services provide very thorough examinations of your living space to detect any presence of mould. It’s our job to help you to minimize the risk of any negative health effects that may arise due to mould in your home. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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