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Preventing Mould Growth In The Home During The Winter

The damp is attacking the wall next to windowMould growth in the home can take place at any time of the year. But during the winter time, our homes are a bit more susceptible to mould infestations. Naturally, with the colder weather, we tend to keep our homes closed up – with the heat on. The warmer we keep our homes, the greater the chances are that we increase its humidity. Mould loves humidity. Dark, damp, warm places throughout your home make for ideal breeding grounds.

As IndoorMould.ca explains, mould “thrives in environments between 60 and 80 degrees and grows wherever there’s humidity or moisture. Mould can be problematic during winter since it can grow in your attic, walls, and other hard-to-reach places.” And because we tend to trap moisture in our homes throughout the winter time, the levels of humidity tend to steadily increase.

“By closing everything and insulating yourself, you actually produce a suitable environment for the fungus,” says IndoorMould.ca, “It’s also likely that you turn the thermostat up, creating a warmer air to combat the winter air. The downside to having your home too encapsulated with insulation is that it prevents warm air from escaping. Moreover, the insulation traps in the humidity and condensation for a longer period during this season because people don’t open their homes to the external environment as much.”

What can be done to prevent mould growth in our homes throughout the winter? Well, firstly, it pays to monitor your humidity levels. According to Luke Armstrong on RestorationMasterFinder.com, indoor humidity levels should be kept below 40 percent. He also advises those who use humidifiers to ensure that they don’t produce excessive amounts of humidity.

Armstrong also recommends that you increase your neat freak tendencies during the winter time. It certainly pays to keep a clean house. He notes that vacuuming and other forms of cleaning can help to remove possible sources of mould growth. The rooms of your home that generate the most moisture should especially be concentrated on. Think your bathroom and your kitchen. One great way to help reduce moisture is to always use the exhaust fans in both rooms.

“Use area rugs or washable floor surfaces rather than wall-to-wall carpeting in areas or rooms that have a moisture issue,” suggests Armstrong, “It’s not usually a great idea to have carpeting in your entryway, for instance, if you live in a cooler, wet climate…Paper, books and clothing are sources of food for mould, so don’t store them in humid parts of your home, such as your basement, especially close to the floor or walls.”

Can maintenance performed outside of the home prevent mould growth within it? It certainly can. Armstrong reminds us to make sure that our gutters and downspouts are clean. The areas underneath the downspouts may need to be extended in order to have water flow away from the foundation. And, if you have a crawl space under the house, you’ll want to cover the soil in that space with waterproof polyethylene plastic.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Mould Assessment Services that assess, analyze and report on the findings of mould in your home, office or building. Our comprehensive assessments include visual inspections for sources of mould, analytical sampling for source and health impact potential from spore exposure, moisture analysis and thermal scanning. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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