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Limiting Mould Growth In The Bathroom

Dirty Bath IVIn a number of our past blogs, we have stressed the importance of eliminating mould from your household’s environment. One of the key factors in mould growth, that we continue to point out, is the presence of moisture. For that reason, we’ve recommended limiting moisture in the home by inspecting for leaks, using exhaust fans and keeping surfaces dry. But, in some cases, this is easier said than done.

To be more specific, in some rooms, pulling off these moisture-limiting activities isn’t all that easy. Sure, we can hopefully remember to turn on the fans in our kitchens and bathrooms each time we are either cooking or bathing. But bathing, after all, requires the use of a great deal of water. Of course, no one is recommending that you avoid water. That would be laughable, as it is impossible to live without it!

It is, however, all about upkeep. In other words, once a shower is completed, it’s important to dry wet surfaces in the bathroom. But how many of us have time for that? This is the reason that black mould is so often found in the tiles of our showers and sometimes on bathroom floors. Keeping moisture at bay in bathrooms is not an easy feat. So there must be some things that we can do to limit mould growth, right?

Don’t ignore the various bathroom accessories. In other words, to limit mould growth as much as possible, you can’t just focus on the surfaces of your bathroom. We expect mould to accumulate in the tiles. But there are numerous objects that often reside in your bathroom that need to be tended to in order to limit the number of places that mould can hide. On HouseLogic.com, Deborah R. Huso provides some sound advice in this regard.

“Use a mildew-resistant shower curtain, and wash or replace it frequently,” she recommends, “Don’t keep bottles of shampoo or shower gel, toys, or loofahs in the shower, as they provide places for mould to grow and hide.” If this provides an inconvenient solution to storing such items, try to be mindful of wiping them down if they become wet during your showers. “Wash your bathroom rugs frequently,” Huso adds.

Inspect hidden areas. To reiterate an important point about mould, it loves to hide in inconspicuous places. It’s not always so easy to detect if you’re not looking for it. So in addition to removing or drying your damp products, you’ll want check the less obvious locations for mould growth. “Check out hidden areas, such as under sinks, access doors to shower and bath fixtures, around exhaust fans, even in crawl spaces and basements underneath bathrooms,” advises Huso.

Make use of mould killers. Bathrooms are places that most of us clean on a regular basis. For obvious reasons, bathrooms should be cleaned often. But some of us forget that wet surfaces, even when clean, can be an issue. Huso reminds us to use “mould-killing products, such as bleach, vinegar, and hydrogen peroxide.” As well, you should, “open windows and doors while cleaning to provide fresh air and help dry out the mould.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Mould Assessment Services that assess, analyze and report on your home, office or building. Our comprehensive assessments include visual inspections for sources of mould, an analytical sampling for source and health impact potential from spore exposure, a moisture analysis and thermal scanning. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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