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Learning To Eliminate Household Mould When It’s Cold

bugOkay, the summer is certainly behind us, but that doesn’t mean that it’s time to worry about the weather getting too cold just yet. Or is it? October will be upon us by the end of the week. And, as most Canadians will experience, chilly days are soon to become the norm. The leaves outside are already starting to turn colour. Yes, the fall season is here and winter is set to follow closely behind. So what does that mean for our health?

Well, surely it’s important to bundle up when going outside. That goes without saying. But when we’re inside, there are others measures that are important to take when it comes to protection from the cold. Sure, you’ll want to keep warm. But, keep in mind, that your home itself requires protection from the elements too. One of the main reasons for this is because with all of the added precipitation that comes with winter, there is bound to be more moisture entering your homes.

What’s wrong with moisture entering the home? Well, where there is moisture, there is mould. And the last thing you want is to invite opportunities for mould growth into your home during the year’s colder months. Not only does winter bring along snow that can cause flooding when it melts, but it also brings about much colder temperatures that produce condensation when meeting with the warm air inside your home.

What can be done to limit or prevent mould growth? According to PolygonGroup.com, you should remove all signs of mould from your home. However, it will require a lot more than simply cleaning the mould away to be rid of the problem for good. “To effectively rid your home of mould, you must address the source of the moisture,” says the site, “Controlling moisture is the key to controlling mould.”

How can moisture effectively be controlled? “Generally, this is done in one of two ways,” says PolygonGroup.com, “First, effectively dry and fix any leaks, spills, or other unintended instances of moisture. Second, utilize proper ventilation and air circulation in known moisture-prone areas.” This includes the exhaust fans in your bathrooms and kitchens. They should always be on during bathing and cooking.

There are other ways to ventilate your home, of course. But during the colder months of the year, you may find opening your windows a less than welcome activity. Believe it or not, it’s still recommended. Ted Shoemaker of Home Energy Magazine writes that “people often avoid ventilating rooms during the cold season to avoid loss of heat. But this, the German Energy Agency (dena) warns, brings a big risk with it: mould.”

How can opening the windows during the winter help to limit mould growth? Shoemaker notes that doing so “swiftly exchanges the moist air and minimizes the loss of energy. The wide practice of opening the windows a crack for longer periods only leads to a slow change of the air and increased heating costs.” By allowing moist air to exit the home, there will be fewer opportunities for it to encourage the development of mould.

Mould is a year round problem. But during the winter months, when we are a lot less likely to allow the air from the outdoors to circulate through our homes, there is greater potential for it to be a problem. At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we are keen on helping our customers to remove it for good. To learn more about our Mould Assessment Services, call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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