DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd.
Indoor Air Quality and Environmental Experts

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Although most Canadians don’t want to admit it, the summertime is slowly, but surely winding down. We’re smack dab in the middle of August, giving us approximately three weeks before the start of a brand new school season. It won’t be long after that when the temperatures drop and the leaves on the trees begin to change colour. Sorry to tell you, ladies and gentlemen, but autumn is on the way!

During the much beloved summertime, we tend to keep our windows open. That is, of course, unless you’re the type of person who prefers air conditioning. We’ve said this numerous times before, but it always deserves repeating that windows should be cracked open on a regular basis in order to allow the stagnant air from inside to circulate with the fresher air from outside. That’s just one way to improve your home’s indoor air quality.

Keep the windows cracked during the fall.

When autumn begins, there’s no reason to stop your window opening routine. Yes, the outdoor air will be chillier, but it’s important to allow proper ventilation in your home to maximize the freshness of the air. As Jeffrey C. May points out on AshiReporter.org, most people spend more time indoors and keep their windows shut when the weather is cooler. It’s a recipe for stale and potentially harmful air in the home.

“In the heating season, up to a third or more of the air in a house comes up from a basement or crawl space — even more, if there’s a basement return present,” informs May, “Basements – both finished and unfinished — that have not been adequately dehumidified in the humid season can be full of non-visible mould growth. “

Engage in fall cleaning.

We’ve all heard of spring cleaning. We’d advocate having fall cleaning become just as popular a practice. On GetCold.net, regular cleaning is recommended as one of the top ways to improve a home’s indoor air quality during the fall. The site provides a number of housecleaning tips including the use of a damp cloth to wipe away dust from ceiling fans, air registers and kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans.

“You should also look inside your ductwork,” the site advises, “You will only be able to see so far, but if there is noticeable debris within the area you can see, it is likely that the rest of the ductwork is also dirty. If you see dirt, dust, cobwebs, or debris, call a professional to have the ductwork inspected and cleaned. Ask guests to take their shoes off so they don’t track dust or dirt into your home and vacuum at least twice per week.”

Use a humidifier.

If you plan on turning up the heat this fall – as most Canadians will – it’s important that you’re mindful of the dryness of the air in your home. GetCold.net notes that dry air is known to cause nosebleeds, dry eyes and irritated sinuses, especially for people who have respiratory issues. “Low humidity can also cause dry skin, annoying static shocks, and cracked, shrinking boards in wood floors,” informs the site, “A humidifier adds water vapour to the air inside your home to prevent these problems.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we’d like to help you enjoy high indoor air quality this fall. For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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