DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd.
Indoor Air Quality and Environmental Experts

855-668-3131
questions@dftechnical.ca
"

Old cellar or cold room in the basementIn our last blog, we pointed out the importance of limiting the possibilities for mould to grow in your home during the coldest months of the year. For the record, you don’t want mould in your home. Not only does it look gross, but it’s simply bad for your health as well. Breathing in its microscopic spores has been known to severely impact respiratory systems. It’s especially bad for those with asthma and allergies.

As PolygonGroup.com explains it, “mould reproduces by emitting microscopic spores that float through the air. As you can imagine, too much mould in the air can adversely affect humans. Not only is mould is a known allergen, but it is also a cause of asthma and other respiratory conditions. If not properly controlled, mould can cause major problems for your home and its inhabitants.”

Our last blog provided a number of helpful tips for homeowners to implement during the upcoming colder months of the year. The theme that runs throughout each tip is “moisture prevention”. Are you doing your part in limiting moisture in your home? NuSiteGroup.com points out that many Canadians are actually contributing to mould growth thanks to their inability to break an unnecessary habit.

Do you have a cold room in your home? According to the website, such a room is no longer necessary in the modern world, as it can produce more harm than good. It would not be surprising if you grew up with a cold room in your home. Many of our parents used it to store certain foods so that they would remain fresh for longer periods of time. But as NuSiteGroup.com points out, this was before we had adequate means of refrigeration.

So what’s the problem with having a cold room? Simply put, it’s a mould producer! “A cold room may sound like a good idea in theory, but they can easily become a breeding ground for mould, which can extent to other areas of your basement and home if left untreated,” reports the Toronto-based website, “Mould’s needs are simple: these are ambient moisture and an organic, cellulose-based host.”

NuSiteGroup.com firmly states that “cold rooms are by nature moist”. It goes on to highly recommend the shutting down of cold rooms across the country. Before the arrival of modern refrigeration, cold rooms may have been worth the risk of mould growth, given that were no adequate alternatives to keeping meat fresh and vegetables crisp. However, with today’s technology, that certainly isn’t the case.

As far as the site is concerned, inviting mould into your home through the outdated cold room makes no sense. “There could also be better things to do with basement space than wasting it on a cold room which is probably underutilized anyway,” it reads, “You could turn it into a den or an extra bedroom and add real value to your property. If it’s a small cold room, you can create additional storage space, allowing you to do something great with the rest of your basement.”

If you are still utilizing a cold room in your home, it would be wise to check for the presence of mould. It could be affecting your health right now. At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Mould Assessment Services that incorporate a number of inspection techniques to locate all sources of mould in your home. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

2 Comments

  1. December 12, 2016 at 9:13 am

    great post and informative. Thanks for sharing

  2. January 18, 2017 at 11:01 am

    Absolutely correct, cold room can bring mold and can effect the air of your home, our wet basement had this issue as it wasn’t waterproofed.

Leave A Comment

*