DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd.
Indoor Air Quality and Environmental Experts

855-668-3131
questions@dftechnical.ca
"

Mould

The Importance Of Avoiding Mould In The Summertime

Mold in the corner of the white ceiling and pink wall, with white curtain on the left side.With the summertime comes heat. And with heat often comes humidity. And with humidity comes moisture. And with moisture often comes mould. Do you see the connection here? We’re not saying that the growth of mould in your home is definitely more likely to occur during the summer. But we’re certainly not saying that it’s not a distinct possibility. The more you protect your home from excess moisture, the better you’ll do at keeping mould at bay.

How do we reduce humidity levels in the home throughout the summer? It begins with keeping our homes at comfortable temperatures that don’t promote moisture. According to Westaway Restorations, “temperatures above 23°C, as well as poorly lit rooms and unmoving air, can actually create more mould. Keep fresh air moving in your home, as well as bright sunlight coming in through your windows. This will help reduce toxic mould.”

In other words, keep your eyes on your thermostat and be sure to open up the windows often enough that you’re allowing fresh air to circulate through each room. Stale and stagnant air doesn’t make for a mould-free home. On days when it’s particularly humid outside, you’ll want to take measures to keep the air inside of your home cool without keeping the windows open. In other words, there will be times when you need A/C.

How does air conditioning help? On HGTV.com, Dwight Barnett points out that “in the summer, a closed house with the air-conditioning turned off will have higher humidity levels than an air-conditioned home…If you had simply left the air conditioning running, it would have cooled the home and removed moisture from the air and circulated and filtered the air.” This is especially true for vacant houses. So, don’t skimp on the A/C if you’re planning a move.

The last thing you want is for your old house’s new inhabitants to complain that you left them with a mould-invested environment. “Moulds thrive when the humidity levels exceed 70 percent,” informs Barnett, “Because humidity levels vary from day to day, the thermostat should have been left at or below 74 degrees, and the fan should have been set to ‘On.’” You’ll also want to ensure that you’ve done some proper cleaning to remove any signs of mould.

What other ways can we avoid mould during the summer? Ensure that you’re repairing any leaks that may be occurring in your home. “If you find any moisture leaks, clean them up with a dry towel immediately and find the source of the leak,” advises Westaway Restorations, “Consider hiring a professional if the leak does not stop or if you are dealing with a plumbing issue…Controlling moisture leaks in your home or place of work will reduce the mould’s ability to thrive.”

How can our clothing encourage mould growth? Naturally, we have to wash our clothes. So they are bound to encounter moisture quite often. The key is to ensure that they are dried adequately. Don’t hang clothes in your closet that is still damp from the wash. Westaway Restorations also points out that leather shoes are excellent food sources for mould! Be sure to keep them clean and free of moisture.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we provide both Mould Assessment Services and Moisture Monitoring Services. We make it our mission to properly evaluate your property for moisture sources that may be causing the development of mould. Such sources may include envelop failures or leakage issues. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

*

Finding Solutions To Rid Your Home Of Mould

Mildewed walls with different sorts of mold (close-up shot)Most of us do our best to keep our homes clean. Of course, it’s not always that easy when you have young children who tend to track mud and dirt into our houses after playing outside. Not to mention, dinner time can result in quite the mess when your children are playing with their food instead of eating. But to be fair, we can’t always blame the kids. How many of us are guilty of leaving dishes in the sink or our clothing on the floors?

Okay, so maybe being neat and tidy all of the time isn’t so easy. However, it needs to be said that keeping a clean home is good for your health. How so? Well consider the fact that when you allow dust to accumulate, you invite allergen-ridden dust mites to infest your home. As well, when you don’t wipe up spills and you allow other food particles to accumulate into messy puddles, you invite mould growth into your living space.

Vacuuming up dust isn’t so hard a task. Especially if you are using a HEPA filter, you are doing yourself quite the favour in maintaining a home with limited dust. But what should be done about that mould problem that you’ve brought on? In some cases, it can be wiped away. And, in others, a major mould problem requires a major cleaning regimen. It’s important to rid your home of mould as it is also known to cause serious health issues.

Mould growth is most prevalent in areas of the home where a lot of moisture occurs. Your shower stall or bathtub is a perfect example. Do you see those dark green or black spots in between the tiles in your bathroom’s shower? That’s mould. And you may notice that it doesn’t disappear with your run-of-the-mill spray and wipe routine. Don’t despair. There’s still a way to get rid of it.

“Surface moulds grow in just about any damp location, such as the grout lines of a ceramic tiled shower,” says FamilyHandyman.com, “They’re easy to scrub away with a mixture of 1/2 cup bleach, 1 qt. water and a little detergent. The bleach in the cleaning mixture kills the mould, and the detergent helps lift it off the surface so you can rinse it away so it won’t return as fast. You can also buy a mildew cleaner at hardware stores, paint stores and most home centres.”

On HousewifeHowTo.com, Katie Berry writes that painted walls also tend to experience mould development. She offers her solution to cleaning it up. “My personal recommendation is to use the vinegar/borax/water method first and wait two days to see if mould returns,” she advises, “If it does, move on to using the bleach/water approach. (Bleach is very irritating to the lungs, eyes and skin, so I prefer avoiding its use whenever possible.)”

She warns that no matter what type of method you use to remove mould from your home, it’s important to wear rubber gloves. That way, you can protect your skin from coming into contact with the mould. As well, she recommends that you “wear old clothing so you can wash it in HOT water to kill any mould spores that wind up on your clothes, and be sure to ventilate the area well while you’re working so you aren’t inhaling the stuff.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we like to see ourselves as mould’s arch enemy. We offer Mould Assessment Services in order to help you locate problem areas of the home where mould may be developing. It’s imperative to pinpoint these areas in order to prevent potential health problems for your family. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

4 Ways To Limit Moisture In The Kitchen

steam on pot in kitchenIn our last blog, we pointed out a few ways that you can reduce the presence of moisture in the bathroom. Naturally, this isn’t an easy feat. Of course, moisture is bound to exist in the bathroom. However, limiting the amount of condensation we produce can go a long way in warding off the presence of mould in our homes. However, bathrooms aren’t the only rooms in the home where a lot of moisture occurs.

Our kitchens are havens for the presence of moisture. Are there greater contrasts between hot and cold than in the kitchen? Condensation, as we explained last time, is produced when warm air hits cold surfaces. Between all the cooking and freezing that takes place within the kitchen, condensation is bound to occur. So how can we minimize its presence in the kitchen in an effort to keep our homes mould-free?

Here are four ways to limit moisture in the kitchen:

1. Cover your pots and pans while cooking. Due to the heat that is produced by stove tops while cooking, there is bound to be a lot of steam emanating from our pots and pans. Covering them with their lids will help to reduce the amount of steam in the air. As explained by CriticalCactus.com, “while cooking, try to cover your food… Oven and stove-top cooking produce more moisture. Slow cookers contribute less to indoor humidity.”

2. Use the exhaust fans. Steam is bound to escape your pots and pans when the lids come off. So using the exhaust fans to capture the steam will help to reduce the moisture in the air. “Ensure that you have opened a window or you are using an extractor fan if you have one fitted,” advises EnviroVent.com, “Don’t turn off the extractor fan or close the window as soon as you finish cooking – leave it open for 15-20 minutes afterwards to clear the air.”

3. Keep a window open. Not all kitchens have windows. But, if your kitchen has one, keeping it open while cooking is a great way to let moisture escape your home. “Adequate ventilation is essential to allow the moisture to escape from a property before it turns into condensation,” insists EnviroVent.com. CriticalCactus.com agrees that “if you do not have exhaust fans or a ventilation system, you can crack a window for a few minutes to dry the air out.”

4. Wipe up spills quickly. The kitchen is most likely the number one room for spills in the home. And while we tend to clean up these spills with wet paper towels, we forget to dry the “clean” left over water when we finish wiping up. Leaving water droplets on surfaces allows for mould to find adequate breeding grounds. The key is to keep the kitchen clean, of course. But, it’s also important to clean it dry!

“Make sure that you wipe down the surfaces in the bathroom and kitchen when you have been cooking or taking a shower to remove any moisture that has settled on the surface,” says EnviroVent.com, “This excess moisture that sits on the surface will quickly turn to mould which is difficult to completely remove.” Using disinfectant wipes for your final wipe down is likely the best bet, since they tend to kill bacteria.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we are only too happy to help with your home’s moisture issues. We offer Moisture Monitoring Services that accurately locate your home’s moisture sources. The less moisture in your home, the safer it is from developing a major mould problem. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

4 Ways To Limit Moisture In The Bathroom

Water drops on metallic tapWith moisture being a chief factor in the development of mould in the home, one would think that keeping moisture to a minimum would be a good idea, right? But, how is this possible when one can’t live without the presence of moisture? After all, we all need water to live! Reducing moisture in the home can be challenging. And this is especially true in the rooms of our home where eliminating the presence of moisture is impossible.

Take the bathroom, for example. Between the sink, toilet and shower – all of which dispense water – how can moisture be limited? Well, the truth is that it would be nonsensical to suggest that moisture be eliminated altogether. It’s important to remember that moisture isn’t exactly a problem unless it is found in excess. For example, the pooling of water without being wiped up after shower may present a future mould problem.

As well, bathroom condensation is hard to avoid. This takes place when warm air is cooled by cold surfaces. Our mirrors, windows and walls will often showcase condensation in the form of tiny water droplets following most showers. This is especially the case after an exceptionally hot shower is taken. And while no one is suggesting that you stop taking showers, a few measures should be taken to limit the amount of condensation they produce.

Here are four ways to limit moisture in the bathroom:

1. Keep it ventilated. If you live on your own, there really isn’t much of a reason to lock the bathroom door when you’re taking a shower. Believe it or not, making “open door showers” a habit will help keep your bathroom ventilated in order to reduce the amount of left behind moisture once bathing is finished. If there is a window in your bathroom, you may want to crack it open during showers as well. And don’t forget to keep that ceiling exhaust fan running.

2. Use anti-condensation paint on your bathroom walls. According to Mary Cockrill on SFGate.com, “this paint helps to insulate the ceilings and walls, thus raising their surface temperatures. A fungicide is often added to these paint formulas to help protect against potential mould growth. Prepare your painting surfaces by removing any existing mould or mildew with a fungicidal solution, following the manufacturer’s recommendations.”

3. Isolate the tiled wall from the actual exterior wall with an air space. If you’re thinking of renovating your bathroom, you may want to consider this tip provided by Marilou Cheple and Pat Huelman of Home Energy Magazine. “This prevents water from moving in through capillary action, and instead provides a space into which the tiles can dry out,” they write, “Vapour from the drying tiles can get back into the bathroom by diffusing through the tile grout or through the paint at the top of the wall.”

4. Turn up the heat. As mentioned, condensation takes place when warm air is cooled by cold surfaces. The warmer the surfaces are, the less condensation will occur. “You can also use an electric towel rail or 120-watt tubular heater to warm your bathroom during the winter,” suggests Cockrill, “These can help to keep your bathroom windows and walls above condensation temperature, are inexpensive to operate, and can be left on 24 hours a day.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Moisture Monitoring Services that work to evaluate your property for moisture sources. They include building envelop failures, leakage issues and occupant-based moisture sources that may be the cause of mould development in the home. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

3 Ways To Stop Mould Problems In Your Basement

Depositphotos_19967309_xsBasements sometimes get a bad rap as the “forgotten” part of the household. In many households, basements are frequently used to entertain guests, workout and even sleep in. But, in many other households, basements are no more than large storage spaces. If something is no longer useful, it isn’t always thrown out. It’s often stuck in the basement. As a result, basements often become crowded with old items that pile up over the years.

Unfortunately, this transforms a basement into the perfect breeding ground for mould. Not only does mould like to grow in dark and dank places, but overcrowded spaces give mould excellent hiding locations. This allows mould to grow undetected for long lengths of time. When mould spores go airborne, they create health hazards that home owners may never even know about. Clearly, this is a problem. So how does one stop a mould problem after it has started?

Here are three suggestions:

1. Start a “toss and clean”. It pretty much is what it sounds like. This term (we’re going to go ahead and say that we coined it!) refers to throwing out any items that have mould growing on them. This is one easy way to rid your basement of mould. And, for the mould growing on your floors, walls and ceilings, it’s time to break out the cleaning products in order to remove it as best as possible.

“If the mould is growing on removable items such as drywall or boxes stacked on the floor, much of it is removed simply by discarding contaminated objects and replacing them with fresh material,” offers Karie Fay on RealEstate.com, “Then, scrubbing the surroundings with detergent and water or a natural product removes the mould residue. It’s cheaper than commercial fungicides and doesn’t burn your eyes, lungs and skin like bleach.”

2. Use bleach, if necessary. Water is one of mould’s top necessities for growth. If your basement has become flooded, you’re bound to experience a mould problem after it has been drained. If so, you may need to use bleach in order to minimize the harmful bacteria that develop as a result of mould growth. Fay provides some instructions for those who are in the process of ridding their previously-flooded basements of mould.

“If your basement flooded, it’s still a good idea to use bleach to sanitize it,” she advises, “Bleach reduces the mold count – it doesn’t completely kill it – and neutralizes harmful bacteria. Mix chlorine bleach with warm water in a bucket at a ratio of one cup (8 ounces) of bleach per gallon of water. As you use the bleach water and it becomes dirty, flush the remainder and mix fresh solution.”

3. Set up new walls. Yes, this sounds like a major undertaking. But, in some cases, the cleaning of a basement isn’t enough to save the walls, floors and ceilings. To completely rid your basement of mould, sometimes starting over is the answer. That way, the remaining mould-induced damage can be covered up with new walls and prevented from becoming the foundation for new mould growth.

“I feel the only way to stop the mould from growing is to clean the walls really well, get them dry and then immediately frame the new walls,” reports TimCarter on AskTheBuilder.com, “Create a 1-inch air space between the back of the wall and the basement wall. Caulk the bottom wall plate so no air can get behind the wall. Insulate the wall and install a continuous high-quality cross laminated vapour barrier on the wall before you install the drywall.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Mould Assessment Services to help you get started with the removal of mould from anywhere in your home. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

How To Limit The Presence Of Moisture In The Home

Damage caused by damp and moisture on a ceilingWith the summer fast approaching, many of us are looking forward to times when we can be outside in the warm sun. Of course, this doesn’t mean that we will begin to practically live outdoors. Naturally, there is still much living to do in each of our homes. With that said, things change a bit inside the home when the weather changes outside. For example, it’s a lot more likely that we’ll be opening our windows to let the warm fresh air from outside in.

This is a great way to improve indoor air quality as it allows for the stale and stagnant air in your home to circulate with the fresh air from outside. However, with warm weather often comes humidity. And when warm days transform into cool nights, there exists the possibility that moisture can accumulate on the surfaces inside our homes. Condensation is most likely to occur when warm air hits a cold surface.

In the Ottawa Citizen, Mike Holmes of the HGTV show, “Holmes Makes It Right” writes that “condensation occurs for a few reasons. Sometimes there’s too much moisture in the home, or not enough ventilation. Or, a humidifier might be set too high. Drop it down about 10% and see if the condensation persists.” So, as you can see, there are numerous ways for moisture to develop inside your home.

So what’s the problem with moisture in our homes? The leading issue is the presence of mould. Mould growth requires moisture. Therefore, the more moisture in the home, the better the chances are that you will be developing areas of mould growth. When mould spores are released into the air, they have very negative impacts on our respiratory systems. Make no mistake about it. There is a direct correlation between moisture, mould growth and ill health.

How can mould growth affect our health? Health Canada reveals that the potential health risks of mould include eye, nose and throat irritation, coughing and phlegm build-up, wheezing and shortness of breath, symptoms of asthma and allergic reactions. Obviously, it pays to limit moisture in the home. One way to do this is always have the exhaust fans on in the bathroom during bathing and the kitchen during cooking.

What else can be done to prevent too much moisture in the home? Holmes insists that you ensure that your windows are installed properly. Cracks could lead to leaks that allow water into your home to pool in certain areas. “With bad windows, warm air meets cold and that creates condensation,” he writes, “It can happen in winter or summer: During winter warm air inside the house hits the cold surface of a single-pane window; in summer, cool air inside the house hits glass that’s warm thanks to higher outdoor temperatures.”

Fresh air inside of the home is also a necessity if you want to keep moisture at bay. You don’t want to keep your homes airtight all of the time. As Holmes puts it, “homes have to breathe. If air can’t get in, moisture also can’t get out, and that moisture can get inside walls and eat away at structure, leading to rot and mould. One of the first signs is condensation on windows and bubbling paint.”

Holmes admits that it’s not possible to have a home completely void of moisture. It’s bound to happen. “We do all kinds of things inside our homes that create moisture and condensation – cooking, taking a shower, even breathing,” he writes, “If you want your home to be healthy, you must get rid of excess moisture.” At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we can help you with that! For information about our Moisture Monitoring Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

5 More Ways To Keep Your Kitchen Mould-Free

Mouldy sliced bread loaf, over white background.In our last blog, we tackled the topic of mould growth in the kitchen. As you can imagine, the kitchen is a natural place for mould to grow. After all, there are plenty of organic materials kept in the kitchen. This is where mould thrives. Not to mention, the kitchen is a high-moisture area. Between the constant cooking and cleaning, there are always spots where mould can develop. As you may already know, mould just loves moisture and humidity.

As a result, it’s important to be mindful of the ways in which we keep our kitchens. Obviously, the cleaner our kitchens are kept, the better. But, as we mentioned last time, it’s not just a clean kitchen that keeps mould at bay. How we both keep and dispose of our food is very important. Sometimes, we forget that throwing our food in the garbage doesn’t actually make it go away. And we also sometimes forget that keeping food in the fridge doesn’t keep it fresh forever!

Here are five more ways to keep your kitchen mould-free:

1. Keep an eye on your produce. Not all food is kept in the fridge, of course. And while many people like to keep their fruits and vegetables cool, many prefer to leave apples, oranges, potatoes, avocados and the like out in the open. Fruit and potatoes, it should be noted, are mould havens. As WikiHow.com describes it, “fruit and potatoes are two types of food where mould thrives”, so it’s important to check on them daily, especially if they are not being refrigerated.

2. Vacuum and dust regularly. When we think of cleaning our kitchens, we tend to think about sponges, mops and disinfectant wipes before we think of vacuums and dusters. BlackMold.AwardSpace.com reminds us that you should still “dust and vacuum often, ideally with a HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filtered vacuum cleaner to remove dust and other substances that mold can grow off of. It has been found that 80% of mould grows on dust.”

3. Clean the refrigerator drip tray a couple of times a year. Do you know what your fridge’s drip tray is? WikiHow.com informs us that the drip tray is “a tray that catches water that condenses and overflows (and) is usually under the front part of the refrigerator.” The site recommends that you not only clean this drip tray to ward off mould growth, but that you also clean the moisture that accumulates on the walls around your refrigerator and kitchen range.

4. Clean cutting boards with vinegar. Remember that mould requires organic materials to grow. Often, we use cutting boards to cut up our meat and produce. Rinsing them off after use isn’t good enough to ensure that no mould forms. WikiHow.com insists that you wash your cutting board every week with vinegar. The site notes that this will reduce mould growth as cutting boards are prime locations for mould growth.

5. Use your exhaust fans. In previous blogs, we have championed the use of exhaust fans in the bathroom. Clearly, bathrooms are high-moisture locations. Those fans are there for a reason. Limiting moisture is key in the prevention of mould growth. While cooking in the kitchen, the same rules apply. “Turn on exhaust fans and vents when cooking or working in the kitchen to prevent humid air in your kitchen,” advises WikiHow.com.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we know how important it is for you to keep your home mould-free. As you may know, the kitchen and the bathroom are not the only locations where mould can form. Our Mould Assessment Services ensure that all sources of mould growth in your home are found so that your family is protected from its harmful effects. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

5 Ways To Keep Mould Out Of Your Kitchen

Mouldy fruit on bright background.When most of us think of mould, we often think about food that has been left out for too long. The “green stuff” on bread or fruit is generally the immediate image that our minds conjure up when thinking about mould. It’s true that mould can often be found on food, as it requires organic materials to feed on. That, and moisture, are what provide mould with the most opportunities to grow. Therefore, it’s important to take measures to keep our food mould-free.

And that means cleaning up in the kitchen! With food being a top choice for mould growth, the better we do at keeping our food fresh and our kitchens clean, the better we will be at keeping mould at bay. As a reminder, this is important because when mould spores become airborne, they can have adverse effects on our health. The bottom line is the less mould you have in your home, the better your health will be.

Here are five ways to keep mould out of your kitchen:

1. Empty the trash often. Sometimes, we forget that when we are throwing out pieces of food left on our dinner plates, they are not being sent off to some magical place where they won’t have any impact. Obviously, garbage cans are not refrigerated. With a dark and moist place to call home, thrown out food can develop mould quickly. “Use a garbage can that holds about one day’s worth of garbage and empty it daily to prevent growth of mould,” insists WikiHow.com.

2. Let the sunlight in. Does your kitchen have a window? If so, you are in a better position to ward off the growth of mould. As mentioned, mould thrives in dark areas. The more sunlight the kitchen gets, the better its chances are of being mould-free. According to BlackMold.AwardSpace.com, “allowing sunlight in will reduce the chances of mould growing so open the curtains in rooms during the day to let natural light in.”

3. Take old food out of the fridge. As most of you know, even refrigeration can’t keep mould at bay forever. All types of food have expiration dates. Not only is it more healthful to eat it while it’s fresh, but it will help ward of mould growth if it’s not kept for too long. “If you think you’ll never eat the food, throw it out immediately,” advises WikiHow.com, “Check the refrigerator thoroughly at least once and dispose of old food.”

4. Keep it cool. With the spring now here and summer around the corner, things are bound to heat up. Remember that mould loves the warmth. So if you are keeping your home cool, you’ll be doing your part in preventing mould from forming. “Mould generally does not grow in cold environments,” explains BlackMold.AwardSpace.com, “Most moulds need temperature of 70 degrees Fahrenheit (20 degrees Celsius) or more to grow.”

5. Empty compost containers regularly. Canadians are known as pretty good recyclers. And, that’s a good thing, of course. But remember that when you are separating organic materials for compost, you are creating mould-inviting environments in your compost containers. According to WikiHow.com, “compost buckets are the one of the worst sources of mould”, so be sure to keep them covered and emptied on a daily basis.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we have many years of experience detecting mould in homes. We’re very well aware that it can develop in many different areas of the home – not just the kitchen. To ensure the best possible indoor air quality of your home, we highly recommend our Mould Assessment Services. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

Limiting Mould Growth In The Bathroom

Dirty Bath IVIn a number of our past blogs, we have stressed the importance of eliminating mould from your household’s environment. One of the key factors in mould growth, that we continue to point out, is the presence of moisture. For that reason, we’ve recommended limiting moisture in the home by inspecting for leaks, using exhaust fans and keeping surfaces dry. But, in some cases, this is easier said than done.

To be more specific, in some rooms, pulling off these moisture-limiting activities isn’t all that easy. Sure, we can hopefully remember to turn on the fans in our kitchens and bathrooms each time we are either cooking or bathing. But bathing, after all, requires the use of a great deal of water. Of course, no one is recommending that you avoid water. That would be laughable, as it is impossible to live without it!

It is, however, all about upkeep. In other words, once a shower is completed, it’s important to dry wet surfaces in the bathroom. But how many of us have time for that? This is the reason that black mould is so often found in the tiles of our showers and sometimes on bathroom floors. Keeping moisture at bay in bathrooms is not an easy feat. So there must be some things that we can do to limit mould growth, right?

Don’t ignore the various bathroom accessories. In other words, to limit mould growth as much as possible, you can’t just focus on the surfaces of your bathroom. We expect mould to accumulate in the tiles. But there are numerous objects that often reside in your bathroom that need to be tended to in order to limit the number of places that mould can hide. On HouseLogic.com, Deborah R. Huso provides some sound advice in this regard.

“Use a mildew-resistant shower curtain, and wash or replace it frequently,” she recommends, “Don’t keep bottles of shampoo or shower gel, toys, or loofahs in the shower, as they provide places for mould to grow and hide.” If this provides an inconvenient solution to storing such items, try to be mindful of wiping them down if they become wet during your showers. “Wash your bathroom rugs frequently,” Huso adds.

Inspect hidden areas. To reiterate an important point about mould, it loves to hide in inconspicuous places. It’s not always so easy to detect if you’re not looking for it. So in addition to removing or drying your damp products, you’ll want check the less obvious locations for mould growth. “Check out hidden areas, such as under sinks, access doors to shower and bath fixtures, around exhaust fans, even in crawl spaces and basements underneath bathrooms,” advises Huso.

Make use of mould killers. Bathrooms are places that most of us clean on a regular basis. For obvious reasons, bathrooms should be cleaned often. But some of us forget that wet surfaces, even when clean, can be an issue. Huso reminds us to use “mould-killing products, such as bleach, vinegar, and hydrogen peroxide.” As well, you should, “open windows and doors while cleaning to provide fresh air and help dry out the mould.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Mould Assessment Services that assess, analyze and report on your home, office or building. Our comprehensive assessments include visual inspections for sources of mould, an analytical sampling for source and health impact potential from spore exposure, a moisture analysis and thermal scanning. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

6 Effective Ways To Keep Mould Growth At Bay

Moldy orangeFor most of us, when we think of mould, we usually drum up pictures of food that has gone bad. The green, mossy-looking growth on our food usually means that it’s time to throw it away. Logically, it makes sense to avoid eating foods that have grown mould. But what most people may not realize is that mould spores can impact our breathing air. And mould can certainly develop in places in the home other than the refrigerator.

Wherever there is moisture, there is the opportunity for mould to grow. “No matter how clean you keep your home, having some mould is inevitable, especially if you live in a humid climate,” writes Krisha McCoy on EverydayHealth.com, “If you have mould inside your home, though, you can take steps to reduce its growth — which is especially important for people who are allergic to the fungal spores that are released by mould.”

Here are six effective ways to keep mould growth at bay:

1. Keep things as dry as possible. To reiterate, mould needs moisture to develop and grow. The drier you keep your living environment, the better you will be at keeping mould at bay. “Mould spores move constantly through the air, both inside and outside the home,” writes McCoy, “Once they find a damp spot, they claim it. That damp spot could be on paper, food, wood, plaster, and carpets. Since mould loves anything wet, the way to control its spread is to keep everything as dry as possible.”

2. Disinfect surfaces that often get wet. Because mould enjoys damp places to grow, it’s important to keep them as clean as possible. Sinks, kitchen and bathroom floors, shower tiles and the like are surfaces where you will often find mould. That is, of course, unless you are keeping them disinfected. “Luckily these are typically non porous surfaces (tile, stone, laminate) which makes them ideal for disinfectants and other cleaners,” writes Joslyn from the MoldBlogger Team, “Once finished cleaning, make sure no moisture remains.”

3. Check for standing water and leaks. The tricky thing about springing a leak is that you may not even know it has happened until you notice the damage that it causes. Faulty plumbing or even an old roof can lead to leaks that may show up as water marks on your ceilings and walls. “Promptly repair any leaks that you detect,” advises McCoy, who also urges us to “regularly wipe up any puddles of water that may accumulate in your kitchen and bathrooms.”

4. Store clothes when they are dry and clean. Have you ever left your clothes in the washing machine too long after the cycle has been completed? Have you ever taken clothes out of the dryer to find that they are still a little damp? Both situations offer mould a place to live. “It is best to keep used clothes dry,” insists Joslyn, “Better yet, wet clothes should be hung to dry. Try to put them outside or in places where there is air circulating.”

5. Clear the clutter. While mould loves damp environments, it’s also pretty good at playing “hide and seek”. The more clutter you have in your home, the more places that mould can hide from you. You’ll want to either throw out unnecessary items or store them outside of your home. “Old books, newspapers, clothing, and bedding that are no longer used can promote the growth of mould, so clear these items out of your house,” recommends McCoy.

6. Prevent condensation. Remember that mould will take advantage of any opportunity it can get to locate moisture in your home. As a result, it’s important to be mindful of condensation existing on surfaces within the home. But how do you prevent it? “Insulating walls and installing storm or thermal pane windows keeps walls warm and limits condensation,” offers Joslyn. There is, however, one more effective way to keep mould growth at bay.

Contact DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. for more information about our Mould Assessment Services today! Call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment