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Mould

3 Liquids You Can Use To Eliminate Household Mould

Mould is nasty! And we’re not just talking about the fact that it looks gross. No one likes to see those black and green clumps accumulating in their bathroom tiles or on their shower curtains. But those aren’t the only places that mould can appear in your household. Mould thrives on the warmth and moisture in your bathroom, but it can also be found in any and all areas of the house where warmth and moisture exist.

And mould isn’t just nasty because of its appearance. It’s known to trigger allergies, invoke asthmas symptoms, create sinus infections and irritate our skin. When it comes to our homes, mould is definitely a villain. So, it’s important that we all fight like superheroes in order to eradicate mould from our home bases. It just so happens that there are some effective secret weapons that can help you!

Here are three liquids you can use to eliminate household mould:

1. Tea Tree Oil.

Tea tree oil is known as a natural, yet powerful fungicide. Unlike many store-bought chemical-based solutions, this effective mould remover provides your home with a sweet scent. Using tea tree oil to eliminate mould is actually pretty easy. All that is required is about ten drops in a spray bottle filled with water. Simply spray the solution on all of the mould-ridden areas of your home and let it sit for a while. You’ll soon be able to wipe away the mould completely.

On NaturalLivingIdeas.com, Janice Taylor heralds tea tree oil as top natural mould removal solution. She offers up some advice on how to maximize its effectiveness. “You’ll still have to scrub a bit, but with repeated use this all-natural cleaner will kill the fungus and help to prevent future growth,” she explains, “Remember: You’ll have to shake this mixture well before each use as the oils will separate.”

2. Vinegar.

Not necessarily the sweetest smelling of all liquid-based mould removers, plain white vinegar is an effective solution nonetheless. Considered one of the world’s best all-natural cleaners in general, vinegar is a naturally antimicrobial solution. As a result, it’s not necessary to mix it with water or any other cleaning products. It kills and dissolves mould and fungus all on its own!

It’s also a very inexpensive solution to your mould problem, Kirsten Hudson points out on OrganicAuthority.com. She goes on to offer some vinegar-based cleaning tips. “Simply fill a spray bottle with vinegar straight up. No diluting!” she writes, “Spritz the vinegar directly on the mouldy spots in your home. Let the vinegar sit for a while and then wipe away the vinegar, mould and all. Repeat as needed.”

3. Vodka.

Yes, you read that right! The popular alcoholic drink is good for more than getting the party started. In fact, the most inexpensive versions of vodka make for the best cleaners, says Taylor. This is because they are filtered less, distilled fewer times and therefore, “contain more congeners like acetaldehyde which is exponentially more toxic (about thirty times more so) to unwanted fungus than ethanol.”

Hudson completely agrees. “Pull out that vodka from your liquor cabinet and pour it into a spray bottle,” she advises, “Don’t worry. You don’t need to grab the top-shelf stuff. The cheap kind actually works better for cleaning. Spritz the vodka straight on mold to put it into a drunken stupor. Let the vodka work for a while, and then use a rag or sponge to wipe away the mould.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we proudly offer Mould Assessment Services to help you combat the mould problem that may exist in your household. Our comprehensive assessments include visual inspections for sources of mould, analytical sampling for source and health impact potential from spore exposure, moisture analysis and thermal scanning.

For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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How Does Hoarding Impact Indoor Air Quality?

For the past couple of years, the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. Blog has made it no secret that one of the easiest ways to improve the indoor air quality of your home is to keep it clean. Sounds simple enough, doesn’t it? Dust, vacuum, mop and sweep – these simple tasks can do a lot to ward off allergens that significantly impact our respiratory systems. However, not everyone is a neat freak.

In fact, there are those who are the polar opposite of neat freaks. Hoarders are individuals who pack their homes with so many items that there is barely enough space to move around. And, as you can imagine, these items can get piled up in ways that create near-impossible-to-clean messes. Naturally, this only promotes poor indoor air quality in a variety of ways. And, interestingly, we’ve found that not enough is being said about it.

We were surprised to find that when typing in “hoarding” and “indoor air quality” into a Google search, the first three articles to appear belonged to our website! Admittedly, we’re pretty proud of that. But even we must admit that it’s been couple of years since we’ve revisited this topic. Naturally, we felt it was the right time to shed some light on how dangerous hoarding can be. It negatively impacts indoor air quality in a number of ways.

It promotes mould growth.

Hoarders tend to toss their belongings into random piles that never seem to stop growing. Everything from clothing to food to electronics can be found in various stacks throughout the home, creating nearly no space for walking, eating or sleeping. What this does is give mould countless opportunities to develop and grow. Mould, you see, requires warmth and moisture.

In addition to the various hidden pockets throughout a hoarder’s home that provide warmth and moisture, mould is also never cleaned when hidden from plain sight. With the presence of mould in the home, it enables mould spores to be released into the air. “Mould is associated with some untoward health effects in humans, including allergies and infections,” says clinical toxicologist, Rose Ann Gould Soloway on Poison.org, “Some health effects attributed to mould may in fact be caused by bacteria, dust mites, etc., found in mould-colonized environments.”

It diminishes ventilation.

It probably goes without saying that when you hoard, you limit or eliminate the ability to get any ventilation going in your home. Many hoarders have so many items piled on top of each other that they cover windows disallowing any air from the outside to enter. Without allowing air to circulate throughout the home, it enables pollutants to accumulate. Simply put, a hoarder’s home is full of stale and contaminated air.

As outlined by Manitoba Hydro’s handbook on indoor air quality and ventilation: “Ventilation of a home and the exchange of ‘stale’ indoor air with ‘fresh’ outdoor air are essential to keep pollutants from accumulating to levels that pose health and comfort problems.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we are committed to helping hoarders reverse the effects of their habits on the air they breathe in their homes. We know that the compulsion to hoard is a complicated one. But it’s important that the quality of air in one’s home isn’t causing any further complications. If you have an issue with hoarding or know a loved one who hoards, you’ll want to contact a professional for help.

You’ll also want to learn more about our Air Quality Services so that we can accurately assess the indoor air quality of your home. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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4 Reminders Of How To Eliminate Mould From Your Home

Never let it be lost on you that mould isn’t just unsightly, it’s unhealthy. It’s also important to remember that mould doesn’t just grow in our bathroom tiles and on food that is left out too long. It’s certainly true that where there is moisture, a breeding ground for mould is available. But mould can grow in areas of our home other than our bathrooms and kitchens. So, it’s important to be reminded of how to eliminate it from your home.

Here are four reminders:

1. De-clutter your home. Being a neat freak doesn’t just help to present your home in a tidy fashion. It helps to keep its inhabitants healthy. Sure, freeing your living space of clutter will help to prevent slips and falls. That’s certainly one way to stay safe. But by eliminating clutter, you will also present fewer opportunities for moisture to accumulate and for mould to find places to develop.

As a mould prevention tip, removing clutter is highly recommended by Karin Beuerlein on HouseLogic.com. “Cast a critical eye on household clutter, and pare down your stuff,” she advsies, “Clutter blocks airflow and prevents your HVAC system from circulating air. Furniture and draperies that block supply grilles cause condensation. All this moisture creates microclimates in your home that welcome and feed mould growth.”

2. Immediately attend to any leaks. The drip, drip, dripping of your faucet is more than just an auditory nuisance. With each drop of water that falls under your sink, the more moisture accumulates in the area. This provides a perfect opportunity for mould to grow. It’s important not to just place a bucket under the drip in order to collect the water, but to repair the source of the leak as soon as possible.

“Even the smallest leak can support mould growth,” informs Tim of All Systems Mechanical, “Water is probably the biggest contributing factor to mould growth in the home so take the time to fix even the smallest leaks. A drop or two here or there under your sink might not seem like much, but after a drop per minute for an entire day, how much water would be there fuelling mould growth?…Fix all of your leaks and make no exceptions and if you don’t know how then choose a good plumber.”

3. Monitor the humidity in your home. It’s important to remember that humidity breeds moisture which breeds mould. During the winter, it’s common for Canadians to keep their windows and doors shut in an effort to keep warm. However, it’s important to ensure that the indoor environment doesn’t become too humid. Opening the windows for short periods of time helps to improve indoor air quality while lowering humidity.

Beuerlein suggests that you invest in an indoor humidity monitor. “An indoor humidity monitor will help you keep track of moisture levels that, ideally, fall between 35% and 50% relative humidity; in very humid climates, at the height of summer, you may have to live with readings closer to 55%,” she writes, “But if you reach 60% relative humidity, it’s time to look for the source of the added moisture; above 70% relative humidity, certain species of mould can begin growing.”

4. Call a professional for help. “If you can’t find the moisture problem on your own, or you aren’t sure how to correct a problem you do find, call a home inspector or indoor air quality consultant,” recommends Beuerlein. And we couldn’t agree more! At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we feel that it’s necessary to remind Canadians that mould growth in the home is more prevalent than they may think.

We also feel it necessary to help out when we can. We proudly offer Mould Assessment Services that assess, analyze and report on the findings of mould in your home, office or building. Our comprehensive assessments include visual inspections for sources of mould, analytical sampling for source and health impact potential from spore exposure, moisture analysis and thermal scanning.

For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

2 Comments

  1. April 23, 2017 at 7:51 pm

    Hi, what is the process when calling a health inspector to come detect my apartment for mold? I am certain there’s is mold I’m just not sure how much mold is too much mold when it comes to your health while pregnant?

    • Dennis French-Reply
      April 24, 2017 at 3:38 pm

      Hello Jessica

      Depending on where you live you simply have to call the local health inspector and they can talk to you about it and whether they will attend your apartment. If they wont, contact me via email to discuss your situation further. dennisf@dftechnical.ca

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3 Ways To Have A Healthier Home In The New Year

Teenager girl throwing pillow into the air, having funMost New Year’s Resolutions focus on self-improvement in some way. Generally, people endeavour to quit smoking, exercise or change their diets to include healthier food choices as ways to better their health. However, most neglect to make resolutions about improving the air they breathe. It goes without saying that the air we breathe is vital to our health. So why not make 2017 the year you make your home the healthiest it has ever been?

Here are three ways to have a healthier home in the new year:

1. Focus on improving indoor air quality. This newfound focus will require many tasks – but they shouldn’t be hard to do. Regular vacuuming, dusting and mopping will do away with many of the dust particles that inhibit our air from being at its purest. Buying some houseplants to improve the oxygen content of the air is also advisable. As well, making sure to take your shoes off before entering your home will prevent excess dirt and grime to come in from outside.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we specialize in Air Quality Services. We employ a number of trained individuals who all have strong understandings of the indoor environment. They maximize their inspection processes in order to target all areas of concern in your home or office. The air you breathe in your home can cause health and wellness issues that you can avoid through thorough inspections.

2. Test for asbestos. Our blog has been closely covering our nation’s campaign for a complete ban of asbestos for many months now. Last week, we proudly reported about the federal government’s plan to completely rid Canada of asbestos by 2018. While we haven’t exported asbestos in quite some time, we were still importing it through such products as brake pads. Known for causing lung cancer, mesothelioma and other deadly respiratory diseases, asbestos is definitely a material you do not want in your home.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services that involved onsite assessments as well as sampling and analysis of the materials collected. Our team will be able to locate asbestos if it is contained within such areas as your furnace, plumbing, electrical wiring, attics, cinder block walls, flooring and ceilings.

3. Limit the moisture in your home. When you shower – especially when you take those long hot showers during the winter – it’s important that you run your exhaust fan. When you’re cooking in the kitchen, running your exhaust fan is just as important. Limiting moisture in your home will help to prevent the growth of mould. When mould spores are airborne, they can present many health hazards to our respiratory systems. Asthmatics are especially aware of this.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we off Moisture Monitoring Services that evaluate buildings for moisture sources such as building envelop failures, leakage issues and occupant-based moisture sources that could be the cause of mould development. We also offer Mould Assessment Services that include inspections involving analytical sampling, moisture analysis and thermal scanning.

Let’s work together on making 2017 your healthiest year yet. For more information on any and all of the above mentioned services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Happy New Year!

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Preventing Mould Growth In The Home During The Winter

The damp is attacking the wall next to windowMould growth in the home can take place at any time of the year. But during the winter time, our homes are a bit more susceptible to mould infestations. Naturally, with the colder weather, we tend to keep our homes closed up – with the heat on. The warmer we keep our homes, the greater the chances are that we increase its humidity. Mould loves humidity. Dark, damp, warm places throughout your home make for ideal breeding grounds.

As IndoorMould.ca explains, mould “thrives in environments between 60 and 80 degrees and grows wherever there’s humidity or moisture. Mould can be problematic during winter since it can grow in your attic, walls, and other hard-to-reach places.” And because we tend to trap moisture in our homes throughout the winter time, the levels of humidity tend to steadily increase.

“By closing everything and insulating yourself, you actually produce a suitable environment for the fungus,” says IndoorMould.ca, “It’s also likely that you turn the thermostat up, creating a warmer air to combat the winter air. The downside to having your home too encapsulated with insulation is that it prevents warm air from escaping. Moreover, the insulation traps in the humidity and condensation for a longer period during this season because people don’t open their homes to the external environment as much.”

What can be done to prevent mould growth in our homes throughout the winter? Well, firstly, it pays to monitor your humidity levels. According to Luke Armstrong on RestorationMasterFinder.com, indoor humidity levels should be kept below 40 percent. He also advises those who use humidifiers to ensure that they don’t produce excessive amounts of humidity.

Armstrong also recommends that you increase your neat freak tendencies during the winter time. It certainly pays to keep a clean house. He notes that vacuuming and other forms of cleaning can help to remove possible sources of mould growth. The rooms of your home that generate the most moisture should especially be concentrated on. Think your bathroom and your kitchen. One great way to help reduce moisture is to always use the exhaust fans in both rooms.

“Use area rugs or washable floor surfaces rather than wall-to-wall carpeting in areas or rooms that have a moisture issue,” suggests Armstrong, “It’s not usually a great idea to have carpeting in your entryway, for instance, if you live in a cooler, wet climate…Paper, books and clothing are sources of food for mould, so don’t store them in humid parts of your home, such as your basement, especially close to the floor or walls.”

Can maintenance performed outside of the home prevent mould growth within it? It certainly can. Armstrong reminds us to make sure that our gutters and downspouts are clean. The areas underneath the downspouts may need to be extended in order to have water flow away from the foundation. And, if you have a crawl space under the house, you’ll want to cover the soil in that space with waterproof polyethylene plastic.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Mould Assessment Services that assess, analyze and report on the findings of mould in your home, office or building. Our comprehensive assessments include visual inspections for sources of mould, analytical sampling for source and health impact potential from spore exposure, moisture analysis and thermal scanning. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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The Importance Of Monitoring Temperature And Humidity In The Home

Mold and moisture buildup on wall of a modern houseIt’s official. Summer is over. We’re now approximately one week into the autumn season. And that means that Canadians can be guaranteed one thing: much colder days are ahead! And while most of us enjoyed the warmth and sunshine that traditionally came along with the summer season, the time has finally come to admit that those warm and sunny days won’t be back for a while. The sun may shine over the next few months…but it will be chilly out there!

So what do Canadians do when it’s cold outside? Well, they stay inside more often, of course. And, naturally, they turn up the thermostats. And while it’s generally quite enjoyable to stay warm and toasty during our lengthy winters, the heat that we’re inviting into our homes has the potential to bring about legitimate health concerns. With heat often comes humidity which involves added moisture in the air. Moisture, as you’re likely aware, invites mould into your home.

It’s important, therefore, for us all to be mindful of just how much moisture is in the air when we are heating our homes. Preventing mould growth begins with being able to adequately measure air moisture. You see, the warmer the air, the more moisture the air can hold. And the more moisture in the air, the more likely your home will be to develop mould. Mould spores, once airborne, can significantly impact our breathing.

How does mould impact our breathing? When a person is exposed to indoor mould, his/her allergies really begin acting up. This is especially true for sufferers of asthma or other respiratory issues. Mould can irritate our eyes, our skin and our lungs even if we don’t have any allergies. And that’s because mould spores can very easily find themselves living throughout our indoor environments making us all susceptible to coming into contact with them.

How does the heating of our homes promote mould growth? When warm, moist air comes into contact with cold surfaces – say, for example, windows, furniture or walls – it can create condensation. This is because the cooler air isn’t able to hold as much moisture as warmer air. So it forms as liquid on those surfaces. Because liquid is present, it provides the perfect conditions for mould to grow. This is why it’s so important to monitor the humidity in your home.

How is humidity measured? Humidity can be measured with a device called a hygrometer. There is a wide variety of hygrometers which ranges from simplistic instruments to multi-functional devices that can measure both temperature and humidity levels. Temperature readings are available in either Fahrenheit or Celsius and humidity scales range from 1% to 100% relative humidity.

What is an ideal indoor relative humidity level in the winter? “Experts have developed rules of thumb to help homeowners make decisions regarding humidity levels in their houses,” informs Mark Salerno in The Toronto Sun, “For example, during the winter, relative humidity in your home should be between 30% and 50%, or even lower to avoid condensation on windows. High relative humidity promotes the growth of mould and dust mites.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Moisture Monitoring Services that evaluate your home for moisture sources. They may include building envelop failures, leakage issues or occupant-based sources. Our assessments may involve moisture meters, thermal scanning and hygrometer readings. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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The Benefits Of Vinegar And Baking Soda For Mould Removal

baking soda and vinegar on the white backgroundFor most of us, mould is pretty hard to avoid. Although we may all take measures to prevent it from rearing its ugly head in our homes, it appears inevitable that some mould will show up. This is especially true in the warmest and dampest areas of our home. The bathroom, of course, is the location that usually first comes to mind. And that’s because, for obvious reasons, it often gets wet in there.

Do you have a problem with black mould appearing in your shower stall or bathtub tiles? If so, you’re not alone. Because so many of us have seen such mould forming in our bathrooms, it tends to be considered normal. But there’s nothing normal about allowing mould to live in our homes. It should go without saying that measures should be taken to remove it as quickly as possible.

The thing is, when we begin attacking mould, we often do so with store-bought products that contain a lot of toxic chemicals. The stronger the smell of these products, the harsher the chemicals usually are. It’s important, therefore, to come up with mould-removing solutions that won’t present any health hazards. And there are two household products that actually form quite the tag team in the world of mould removal – vinegar and baking soda.

How does vinegar combat mould growth? As explained by Maids.com, “Vinegar is a mild acid which can kill 82% of mould species.” And because we often use vinegar in our food, you may have guessed that it isn’t hazardous to our health. Perhaps, its potent smell is the only downside to using it in our bathrooms to remove mould. But it generally subsides shortly after its use anyways.

“Use white distilled vinegar and pour it into a spray bottle without watering it down,” instructs Maids.com, “Spray the vinegar onto the mouldy surface and leave it to sit for an hour. Finally, wipe the area clean with water and allow the surface to dry. Any smell from the vinegar should clear within a few hours, but if it lingers, you can freshen up the space with bowls of lemon water around the area.”

How does baking soda combat mould growth? “Baking soda is a mild, white mineral powder, that can be used to kill mould in your home, plus it is safe for your family and pets,” assures Maids.com, “In addition to killing mould, it will absorb moisture to help keep mould away.” As you may already be aware, baking soda is used for a wide variety of purposes and is incredibly inexpensive – so it comes in quite handy as a multi-purpose household product.

“To properly care for your bathroom and remove the mould from tile grout, you will need a good scrub brush and baking soda,” asserts Melissa Maker on NaturallySavvy.com, “To effectively scrub the mould away, treat the grout between tiles and the caulking with a paste made of water and baking soda. Leave on for as long as you need to…Spray the tiles with water and use a scrub brush to clean the grout with a brisk back and forth motion. Rinse well and buff dry.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we understand that mould removal isn’t always that easy. That’s why we offer our Mould Assessment Services that assess, analyze and report on the findings of mould in your home, office or building. Our comprehensive assessments include visual inspections for sources of mould, analytical sampling for source and health impact potential from spore exposure, moisture analysis and thermal scanning.

For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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Taking Steps To Prevent Mould Growth In The Home

Condensation cause mold and moisture in the house -Towel absorbs water from the windowMould is often associated with food that has gone bad. That mossy green stuff is a clear indicator that whatever you had leftover is now inedible. However, mould can actually be found all throughout our homes. It comes in different forms and colours. So, it’s important to know where and why it exists. Because mould spores can be hazardous to our health, it’s wise to take the necessary steps to prevent mould growth in our homes.

Where can mould be found in our homes? Mould most often grows in areas of the home that are damp and poorly ventilated. It often appears black, brown or dark green in colour. It can show up on our walls, ceilings and around windows where moisture can seep through cracks. It also commonly rears its ugly head in our showers and bathtubs, especially between the tiles – also places where there is a lot of moisture.

Mould can also be found in our carpets and in our closets. Especially when we keep our homes untidy or cluttered, mould has the ability to find dark, dank spaces to grow. Be on the lookout for stains that may have been caused by leaks or other water damage. This will especially be important during the upcoming fall season when there may be a lot of rainfall and during the winter when the snow on top of our homes melts.

How can you discover what caused the mould growth? In order to determine the source of the mould, it’s a good idea to inspect the outside of your house. That way, you’ll be able to locate openings where moisture may be able to seep into the home. Be sure to check out your roof, the siding, your attic, the gutters and the drains. Of course, you’ll also want to inspect areas inside of the home – especially behind your furniture, in closets and storage spaces and in the basement.

What can you do to prevent mould growth? Keeping a clean and tidy home is an excellent start. The quicker you’re able to locate leaks or wipe up spills, the better. You don’t want pools of water to accumulate anywhere as mould simply thrives on moisture. Be sure to clean and dry all water spillage within a day or two. And if any of your home’s elements experience water damage, it’s best to replace them right away.

You also want to avoid having it be too humid inside the home. Among other issues, humidity creates condensation on the windows and the walls. To decrease the humidity in your home, you’ll want to limit the length of your showers, especially if you’re using particularly warm water that generates a lot of steam. You know all of that mist that is left on your mirror after a shower? That’s a sure fire sign that it is way too humid.

Be sure to use the exhaust fan in the bathroom during your showers. Do the same in the kitchen when you’re cooking. You’ll also want to ensure that your home is properly ventilated. Open the windows as often as possible to allow the air from inside to circulate with the air from outside. If you have a ventilation system, make sure that you are regularly maintaining it. This will all help to prevent humidity levels from getting too high.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Mould Assessment Services that assess, analyze and report on the findings of mould in your home, office or building. Our comprehensive assessments include visual inspections for sources of mould, analytical sampling for source and health impact potential from spore exposure, moisture analysis and thermal scanning. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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3 Ways To Prevent Mould And Mildew Growth In Your Home

worker with helmet, gloves and mask spraying ceiling with spray bottle on wooden vintage ladder, bottom viewCanada doesn’t get enough credit for its hot and sunny summers, does it? Our country is most often associated with wintery imagery and the stereotypes that we all live in igloos! The truth, however, is that our summers can be quite warm and humid. And humidity, as we all should know, is the cause of excess moisture. And when excess moisture seeps into our homes, it can be the cause of mould and mildew growth.

How can you prevent mould and mildew growth in your home? Here are three ways:

1. Repair all of the moisture problems that you can find. Mould and mildew spores have the ability to travel through the outdoor air and into your home. They gravitate towards moist surfaces, so it’s important to prevent leaks and spills. That means that you’ll need to repair any holes in your roof, leaky pipes and cracks in the walls. It’s also wise to replace old air conditioning, heating and ventilation systems.

According to HorizonServicesInc.com, it’s important to not neglect your basement when searching for moisture problems. “If water and moisture accumulates in concrete slabs and basement walls, you may need to install a sump pump or dehumidifier,” the site recommends, “Don’t procrastinate…delays may have devastating consequences.”

2. Increase the air circulation throughout the home. Take advantage of the summertime by opening up your windows each and every day. Feel free to use fans as well. That way, you’ll be able to move the warm air around to all the areas of your home. Be sure to use the fans that your home is already equipped with too. That means that your exhaust fans in your bathrooms and kitchens should be active, especially during bathing and cooking.

On MoldBlogger.com, Jonathan reminds us of the importance of exhaust fans. “Your foggy mirror isn’t the worst problem you’ll have if you don’t use the fan during your shower,” he writes, “The moisture in the air is getting into every nook and cranny, the kind of places that are very hard to clean, even if you do notice the mould growing there. Exhaust fans help minimize the moisture level in the bathroom as well as the possibility of growing mould.”

3. Become a mopping and wiping master. Don’t allow for spills, drips and leaks to form into puddles that linger around your home. It’s imperative that you clean up all areas of wetness that may develop. This is especially important for wet carpets. The moisture can seep into the floor beneath the carpet and present mould and mildew issues that you can’t see. In fact, it’s best to remove carpets and replace them with hardwood floors.

HorizonServicesInc.com explains how bleach can be used as an effective killer of mould and mildew. “Floors, counters, window sills, appliances and kitchens and bathroom fixtures should be cleaned regularly with not just soap or detergent but an anti-bacterial and anti-fungal agent,” says the site, “One containing ammonia bleach is your best bet for overall effectiveness. But be careful — bleach can damage surfaces, clothing and skin, especially if you use it straight and don’t dilute. Be sure to wear gloves and protect yourself and surfaces from splatters.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we proudly offer Mould Assessment Services that thoroughly inspect your home or office for moisture sources that could produce mould and mildew. By inspecting building envelop failures, looking for leakage issues and detecting occupant-based moisture problems, we help our clients to avoid the major health risks associated with mould and mildew growth.

For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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The Importance Of Getting A Mould Inspection Before Summer

Mold on the window in the houseWhen the summer approaches, most of us conjure up ideas of walking around in shorts and t-shirts to take in the warmth and sunshine. And while summer is the season of bright and sunny days, it is not without its rainy and dreary ones either. When you combine the heat associated with summer and the dampness associated with precipitation, what do you get? The potential for mould growth – and that insists upon protecting ourselves from its harmful effects.

How do summer storms impact our health? On MoldInspections.ca, Toronto-based mould inspection expert, Tara Valley reveals that rain doesn’t necessarily wash away the pollen that generally causes allergy symptoms to flare up. Instead, allergy sufferers often feel the effects of toxic mould after a rain storm. She notes that winds during storms can send pollen airborne, allowing it to travel great distances.

And pollen has an accomplice, “a hazardous material that produces many allergy-like symptoms when inhaled,” Valley describes, “The partner in crime is toxic mould…Unfortunately, there’s a dangerous overlap between hay fever symptoms and mould, including coughing and wheezing. If you’re a regular hay fever sufferer being exposed to mould, you’ll feel like you never get a break from your symptoms, even during a rainstorm.”

How does potential flooding worsen allergy symptoms? As you’re aware, water provides the perfect breeding ground for mould growth. During the warm summers, rain storms that lead to flooding, leave basements highly susceptible to mould infestations. “Mould spores will begin to grow and infest any area that moisture lingers,” Valley explains. Hot temperatures and humidity only exacerbate the situation.

What can be done to limit or avoid mould growth post-flooding? Valley insists that you act quickly, by trying to clean and dry dampness within 24-48 hours of the flooding. She recommends the use of dehumidifiers, fans and heaters to help dry out any rooms that are susceptible to mould infestation. As well, she advises that you remove drywall and any other porous materials that have been dampened.

“Don’t use the area and if possible, stay somewhere else until mould remediation has been completed,” Valley continues, “Try to avoid any contact with any mould – contact with your skin can be harmful and disturbing the spores means you can inhale them.” Hopefully, you won’t have to endure any flooding this summer. In fact, if you prepare for such a worst-case scenario, you can avoid the problems associated with summer flooding altogether.

What can be done to prevent flooding in the event of a summer rain storm? Valley offers up a number of suggestions. They include installing a backwater valve in your basement, extending your downspouts so that they route water away from your home instead of close to basement windows, regularly cleaning debris from your eavestroughs and raising or building up the ground around your house so that water drains away from it instead of toward it.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Mould Assessment Services that thoroughly inspect your home or office for moisture sources that could produce mould. Inspecting building envelop failures, leakage issues and even occupant-based moisture problems, our services help our clients to avoid the health risks associated with mould growth. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

We would also like to take this opportunity to express our deepest concerns for all of our neighbours in Fort McMurray who are enduring this incredibly troubling time due to the wildfires. We encourage you to donate to the Alberta Fires Appeal through the Canadian Red Cross HERE. All donations will be matched by the Government of Canada.

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