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Moisture

The Importance Of Removing Mould From Your Home

Mildewed walls with different sorts of mold (close-up shot)Mould is a problem. It’s not just something that appears on old food that can be removed from your home simply by throwing the food out. Mould has a tendency to grow in areas where it can’t be seen. It thrives on moisture and our homes provide plenty of it. Especially in rooms such as the kitchen and the bathroom, the constant presence of moisture allows for mould to find a home. But it’s important to keep it out of your home.

What’s so dangerous about mould? As Joe Cuhaj explains on TodaysHomeowner.com, the presence of mould in the home can lead to a number of negative health effects. He writes that although it often results in minor allergic reactions such as sniffling, watery eyes and sneezing, “some people are more sensitive than others and may experience a stronger reaction that can include difficulty breathing and asthma attacks.”

What is it about mould that causes breathing difficulty? “Several types of mould release toxic substances called mycotoxins,” explains Cuhaj, “Exposure to high concentrations of mycotoxins from Stachybotrys (a greenish-black green mould that grows on cellulose material such as wallpaper, cardboard, and wallboard) or Chaetomium (a white to gray colored mold found on decaying wood and water damaged drywall) may lead to more severe health issues including chronic bronchitis, heart problems, and bleeding lungs.”

So what can be done about preventing mould growth? The first step would be to control the amount of moisture that is present in your home. As we alluded to earlier, it’s practically impossible to avoid moisture altogether as cooking and bathing – two very common daily routines – require the use of water. Controlling moisture, however, includes looking for damage in your home that may be leading to leaks.

The absence of leak sources will be very helpful in keeping mould at bay. But to control moisture, it’s important to monitor your home’s humidity levels as well. According to Gerri Willis on CNN.com, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “recommend keeping the humidity level in your house below 50 percent.” She goes on to suggest that you “use an air conditioner during humid months.”

What else can be done to control humidity in the home? “Make sure to check the ventilation in the kitchen and the bathroom,” advises Willis, “Open a window or turn on a fan when showering. Do not carpet bathrooms and consider using mould inhibitors that can be added to paints. If you see moisture building up, act quickly and dry the area. If you have any water leaks, whether it is coming in through the roof, or from a pipe or the ground, patch it up immediately.”

How can mould be cleaned up? It all depends on the amount of mould and the size of the area that needs to be cleaned. “If the mould is limited to an area of less than 10 square feet, then you might be able to clean it up yourself,” informs Cuhaj, “Areas larger than that should be handled by a professional. If you decide to enlist a professional, make sure they are trained and experienced in mould cleanup.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we couldn’t agree more. Our Mould Assessment Services provide very thorough examinations of your living space to detect any presence of mould. It’s our job to help you to minimize the risk of any negative health effects that may arise due to mould in your home. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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Limiting Household Moisture In The Wintertime

A view out a cabin window with condensation overlooking a snowy mountain landscapeHumidity and moisture go hand in hand. When we think of humidity, we often think of the sweaty and sticky state that it generally leaves us in. With summer now behind us, most of us are likely thinking that we don’t have worry about humidity until next year. But that doesn’t mean that the presence of moisture has disappeared. In fact, with winter coming in a couple of months, we’ll soon be experiencing more moisture than we’ll know what to do with!

The first reason is because, we Canadians tend to turn up the heat in our homes when it’s cold outside. Can you blame us? Canadian winters don’t exactly provide the warmest temperatures. As well, we also generally keep all of our doors and windows shut so as to not let out any heat. The warmer we are, the better, right? Well, as Tiffany Wild of Paragon Certified Restoration points out, closing up our homes and turning up the heat during the winter can cause some problems.

“You may think this would be a good thing since this would limit the amount of heat that escapes, but this can also lead to the buildup of moisture which can cause mould and mildew inside of the home,” she informs us. Wild goes on to note that mould-inducing moisture problems, during the winter, are generally the direct result of one of two problems: moisture in the air and moisture from actual liquid.

What problems are caused by moisture in the air? Keeping in mind that we much prefer warmer air in our homes during the winter, it presents a vast difference between it and the air outside. With much colder air hitting the outsides of our windows, condensation builds up. Wild writes that “the relative humidity on the surface of the window is 100%.” And, as you may have guessed, this humidity provides the breeding ground for mould and mildew.

“You may also notice some moisture on the window sill or on the window casing (the frame that goes around the window.),” Wild writes, “When this happens, mould and mildew can start developing in these areas. You may also notice mould or mildew forming on the insides of exterior walls, or on clothes or shoes that are located in closets where the temperature is lower than the adjoining room.”

What problems are caused by moisture from actual liquid? Quite obviously, the falling of snow is a telltale sign that winter has arrived. Here, in Calgary, we sometimes don’t even need for the official start of winter to begin seeing the fluffy white stuff fall from the sky. And as Wild points out, the accumulation of snow on our homes can lead to plumbing and roofing issues – the worst being “ice dams”.

“Ice dams usually form on your roof and in your gutters and can cause serious problems and damage if they are not dealt with properly,” she reveals, “Once an ice dam has froze on your roof, water will continue to build up behind it and will eventually run backwards underneath your shingles and into your home. Once you have water leaking into your home from the outside, you have an entirely new and expensive problem that will need to be dealt with.”

DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. is prepared to assist you with your winter preparations. Our Moisture Monitoring Services can locate issues on your property such as sources of leaks and other contributors to the development of mould within the home. Let’s work together in keeping your home mould and mildew free this winter! For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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Doing Away With The Cold Room

Old cellar or cold room in the basementIn our last blog, we pointed out the importance of limiting the possibilities for mould to grow in your home during the coldest months of the year. For the record, you don’t want mould in your home. Not only does it look gross, but it’s simply bad for your health as well. Breathing in its microscopic spores has been known to severely impact respiratory systems. It’s especially bad for those with asthma and allergies.

As PolygonGroup.com explains it, “mould reproduces by emitting microscopic spores that float through the air. As you can imagine, too much mould in the air can adversely affect humans. Not only is mould is a known allergen, but it is also a cause of asthma and other respiratory conditions. If not properly controlled, mould can cause major problems for your home and its inhabitants.”

Our last blog provided a number of helpful tips for homeowners to implement during the upcoming colder months of the year. The theme that runs throughout each tip is “moisture prevention”. Are you doing your part in limiting moisture in your home? NuSiteGroup.com points out that many Canadians are actually contributing to mould growth thanks to their inability to break an unnecessary habit.

Do you have a cold room in your home? According to the website, such a room is no longer necessary in the modern world, as it can produce more harm than good. It would not be surprising if you grew up with a cold room in your home. Many of our parents used it to store certain foods so that they would remain fresh for longer periods of time. But as NuSiteGroup.com points out, this was before we had adequate means of refrigeration.

So what’s the problem with having a cold room? Simply put, it’s a mould producer! “A cold room may sound like a good idea in theory, but they can easily become a breeding ground for mould, which can extent to other areas of your basement and home if left untreated,” reports the Toronto-based website, “Mould’s needs are simple: these are ambient moisture and an organic, cellulose-based host.”

NuSiteGroup.com firmly states that “cold rooms are by nature moist”. It goes on to highly recommend the shutting down of cold rooms across the country. Before the arrival of modern refrigeration, cold rooms may have been worth the risk of mould growth, given that were no adequate alternatives to keeping meat fresh and vegetables crisp. However, with today’s technology, that certainly isn’t the case.

As far as the site is concerned, inviting mould into your home through the outdated cold room makes no sense. “There could also be better things to do with basement space than wasting it on a cold room which is probably underutilized anyway,” it reads, “You could turn it into a den or an extra bedroom and add real value to your property. If it’s a small cold room, you can create additional storage space, allowing you to do something great with the rest of your basement.”

If you are still utilizing a cold room in your home, it would be wise to check for the presence of mould. It could be affecting your health right now. At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Mould Assessment Services that incorporate a number of inspection techniques to locate all sources of mould in your home. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

2 Comments

  1. December 12, 2016 at 9:13 am

    great post and informative. Thanks for sharing

  2. January 18, 2017 at 11:01 am

    Absolutely correct, cold room can bring mold and can effect the air of your home, our wet basement had this issue as it wasn’t waterproofed.

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Learning To Eliminate Household Mould When It’s Cold

bugOkay, the summer is certainly behind us, but that doesn’t mean that it’s time to worry about the weather getting too cold just yet. Or is it? October will be upon us by the end of the week. And, as most Canadians will experience, chilly days are soon to become the norm. The leaves outside are already starting to turn colour. Yes, the fall season is here and winter is set to follow closely behind. So what does that mean for our health?

Well, surely it’s important to bundle up when going outside. That goes without saying. But when we’re inside, there are others measures that are important to take when it comes to protection from the cold. Sure, you’ll want to keep warm. But, keep in mind, that your home itself requires protection from the elements too. One of the main reasons for this is because with all of the added precipitation that comes with winter, there is bound to be more moisture entering your homes.

What’s wrong with moisture entering the home? Well, where there is moisture, there is mould. And the last thing you want is to invite opportunities for mould growth into your home during the year’s colder months. Not only does winter bring along snow that can cause flooding when it melts, but it also brings about much colder temperatures that produce condensation when meeting with the warm air inside your home.

What can be done to limit or prevent mould growth? According to PolygonGroup.com, you should remove all signs of mould from your home. However, it will require a lot more than simply cleaning the mould away to be rid of the problem for good. “To effectively rid your home of mould, you must address the source of the moisture,” says the site, “Controlling moisture is the key to controlling mould.”

How can moisture effectively be controlled? “Generally, this is done in one of two ways,” says PolygonGroup.com, “First, effectively dry and fix any leaks, spills, or other unintended instances of moisture. Second, utilize proper ventilation and air circulation in known moisture-prone areas.” This includes the exhaust fans in your bathrooms and kitchens. They should always be on during bathing and cooking.

There are other ways to ventilate your home, of course. But during the colder months of the year, you may find opening your windows a less than welcome activity. Believe it or not, it’s still recommended. Ted Shoemaker of Home Energy Magazine writes that “people often avoid ventilating rooms during the cold season to avoid loss of heat. But this, the German Energy Agency (dena) warns, brings a big risk with it: mould.”

How can opening the windows during the winter help to limit mould growth? Shoemaker notes that doing so “swiftly exchanges the moist air and minimizes the loss of energy. The wide practice of opening the windows a crack for longer periods only leads to a slow change of the air and increased heating costs.” By allowing moist air to exit the home, there will be fewer opportunities for it to encourage the development of mould.

Mould is a year round problem. But during the winter months, when we are a lot less likely to allow the air from the outdoors to circulate through our homes, there is greater potential for it to be a problem. At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we are keen on helping our customers to remove it for good. To learn more about our Mould Assessment Services, call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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4 Ways To Limit Mould Growth In Your Home

strawberry with mold fungus, no longer suitable for consumptionIn our last blog, we revisited the importance of minimizing mould growth in the home. It sounds easier said than done. To be honest, we’ve all likely come across some mould in our homes at some point. Seeing it develop on food that’s been left out too long isn’t all that uncommon. And those bathroom tiles always seem to need a little extra scrubbing, don’t they? Preventing mould might not always be possible. But limiting it is.

Here are four ways to limit mould growth in your home:

1. Get rid of materials that have been soaked. We’re sorry to have to tell you this, but if you’ve experienced a flood in your home, your water-damaged materials are going to have to go. Mould can quickly grow where there is dampness and moisture. And it doesn’t take a flood to make things in your home damp and moist. Heidi Hill of the Mother Nature Network points this out pretty clearly.

“If you’ve experienced a flood, remove water-damaged carpets, bedding, and furniture if they can’t be completely dried,” she advises, “Even everyday occurrences need attention: don’t leave wet items lying around the house, and make sure to dry the floor and walls after a shower. Don’t leave wet clothes in the washing machine, where mould can spread quickly. Hang them to dry — preferably outside or in areas with good air circulation.”

2. Keep your bathrooms as spotless as possible. Keeping your bathroom clean isn’t just good news for your eyes and nose (who doesn’t like a clean looking and fresh smelling bathroom?), but it will work wonders in your quest to limit mould growth. Because bathrooms are where showers take place, they take top spot on the list of household rooms where you’ll find the most moisture.

Better Homes and Gardens highly recommends that you give your bathrooms some special attention. “Few rooms in the home see as much moisture and humidity as the bathroom,” notes their website, “Be sure your bathroom stays well-ventilated. An exhaust fan will help circulate the air and remove moisture more quickly. These additional actions will help keep your bathroom fresh and mould-free.”

3. Ventilate, ventilate, ventilate! To piggyback off of one of the final points just made, it’s important to keep all rooms where moisture is bound to occur well ventilated. Your kitchen is no exception. This is why exhaust fans exist above your stove the same way they do in your bathroom. Use them! And whenever possible, be sure to crack open a window to allow fresh air to circulate and moisture to escape.

“It may be that your routine domestic activities are encouraging the growth of mould in your home,” says Hill, “Make sure an activity as simple as cooking dinner, taking a shower, or doing a load of laundry doesn’t invite mould by providing proper ventilation in your bathroom, kitchen, laundry room, and any other high-moisture area. Vent appliances that produce moisture — clothes dryers, stoves — to the outside (not the attic).”

4. Contact DF Technical & Consulting Serviced Ltd. Our Mould Assessment Services are your go-to professional method of locating any and all traces of mould in your home. Through a number of comprehensive assessments, we analyze and report on any problem areas of your property. The mould in your home doesn’t stand a chance! For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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Taking Measures To Minimize Mould In The Home

petri dish with developing mold specimen held by a hand in a blue rubber glove and a white lab coatNow that September is here, a lot of us are already planning for the fall. Slowly, but surely the weather is about to cool down and we’ll have to get set for chillier temperatures. For many Canadians, this is horrible news. Many of us can’t get enough of the warmth and sunshine. And for many others, the advent of autumn is a great time of year. With less heat, there is often less humidity. And with less humidity, there is less of a risk for mould to develop in our homes.

So what’s the big deal if mould grows in our homes? Well, firstly, it’s pretty unsightly. But secondly, and more importantly, it’s a health hazard. “Mould can grow anywhere: on carpet, clothing, food, paper, and even in places you can’t see, such as the backside of drywall, areas inside walls around leaking or condensing pipes, and above ceiling tiles,” explains Heidi Hill of the Mother Nature Network.

She goes to explain that removing mould from the home can be both difficult and expensive. What’s worse is that the allergens produced by mould can impact your health. This is especially true for people with asthma and allergies. Studies have shown that those who suffer from respiratory issues are most likely to feel the effects of airborne mould spores. But they are not alone. They can impact anyone’s health negatively.

What negative impacts can mould have on our health? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveals that a 2004 Institute of Medicine (IOM) study “found there was sufficient evidence to link indoor exposure to mould with upper respiratory tract symptoms, cough, and wheeze in otherwise healthy people; with asthma symptoms in people with asthma; and with hypersensitivity pneumonitis in individuals susceptible to that immune-mediated condition.”

So what can be done to prevent mould growth? As we alluded to earlier, an excess of moisture provides the perfect breeding ground for mould development. So, it’s important to keep moisture in the home to minimum. Of course, moisture cannot be completely avoided. After all, everyone has to eat, clean and bathe. And all of these daily activities require the use of moisture-causing heat and water in some way.

So how do we limit moisture? According to Better Homes and Gardens, the first step involves checking areas in your home, such as damp basements and crawl spaces, where there is high humidity. “Mildew and mould can grow on wood products, ceiling tiles, cardboard, wallpaper, carpets, drywall, fabric, plants, foods, and insulation,” explains their website, “These growths can begin to develop on a damp surface within 24 and 48 hours and produce spores that travel through the air.”

It’s also important to keep the surfaces in your home as dry as possible. That includes wiping up spills immediately and not allowing liquid to accumulate and pool anywhere. “Mould can’t grow without moisture, so tackle wet areas right away,” advises Hill, “Seepage into the basement after a heavy rainfall, accumulation from a leaky pipe, even a spill on the carpet should be dried within 24 to 48 hours.”

You can also enlist the services of DF Technical & Consulting Serviced Ltd. to ensure that any traces of mould in your home are properly located. We provide Mould Assessment Services that seek to analyze and report on any problem areas of your home or office through a number of comprehensive assessments. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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5 Ways To Minimize Mould During The Summer

Depositphotos_64844439_s-2015It’s been a hot and muggy summer so far, for many cities across Canada. And, in many cases, hot weather brings about humidity. The more humid it gets, the more moisture that exists. And when it comes to moisture in the home, the more of it that there is, the better your chances are of having a mould problem. Of course, this negatively impacts your indoor air quality. So how can we battle the impending growth of mould during the summer’s hot months?

Here are five ways to minimize mould during the summer:

1. Kill it! One of the best ways to get rid of mould is to naturally destroy it. This means using a product that is free of harmful chemicals which would only serve to worsen your home’s indoor air quality. On TakePart.com, Marie Stegner reveals that when you pour white distilled vinegar into a spray bottle, you’ve created an ideal mould killing machine. Simply spray the vinegar on the mouldy areas of your home and let it set without rinsing, she advises.

2. Conduct a late spring clean. If you didn’t get around to doing any spring cleaning a few months back, it doesn’t mean that you can’t get started on tidying things up. On HouseLogic.com, Karin Beuerlein advises that you eliminate clutter. “Clutter blocks airflow and prevents your HVAC system from circulating air,” she writes, “Furniture and draperies that block supply grilles cause condensation.”

She goes on to note that all of that added moisture in the home creates “microclimates…that welcome and feed mould growth.” Stegner also recommends that you keep things clean and tidy in order to avoid such a problem. Proper storage of winter apparel comes highly recommended. “Put away collectibles and winter clothes in plastic storage bags to prevent mould growth on clothes and other household items not in regular use,” she advises.

3. Keep things dry. If you want to minimize moisture, one easy way to do that is to clean up spills immediately to prevent them from pooling. You’ll also want to find ways to prevent it from becoming too humid in your home. Stegner recommends that you “keep the humidity level in your home between 40 to 60 percent. Use a dehumidifier during humid summer months and especially in damp spaces, like basements.”

4. Choose between air conditioning or opening the windows. Don’t do both. If it’s cool enough outside, you may as well let some fresh air in your home. However, if it’s hot and humid, go with the A/C. “When you open windows and doors, you let air conditioning escape, waste money, and invite humid air into your cooler home,” warns Beuerlein, “This causes condensation, which mould loves. So keep doors and windows shut when the A/C is humming.”

5. Maintain good ventilation. Keep the air moving throughout your home. Don’t let things get too stale or stagnant. As mentioned, this will involve some opening of the windows during the right times of the day. However, according to Stegner, you’ll also want to “double-check the ventilation throughout the home. Use exhaust fans that vent outside the home in the kitchen and bathroom. Ensure clothes dryers vent outdoors as well.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we consider ourselves mould’s arch enemy! If there is mould hiding in your home, we will ensure that it is found so that it can be removed. The absence of mould in the home is imperative for top-notch indoor air quality. For more information about our Mould Assessment Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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The Importance Of Avoiding Mould In The Summertime

Mold in the corner of the white ceiling and pink wall, with white curtain on the left side.With the summertime comes heat. And with heat often comes humidity. And with humidity comes moisture. And with moisture often comes mould. Do you see the connection here? We’re not saying that the growth of mould in your home is definitely more likely to occur during the summer. But we’re certainly not saying that it’s not a distinct possibility. The more you protect your home from excess moisture, the better you’ll do at keeping mould at bay.

How do we reduce humidity levels in the home throughout the summer? It begins with keeping our homes at comfortable temperatures that don’t promote moisture. According to Westaway Restorations, “temperatures above 23°C, as well as poorly lit rooms and unmoving air, can actually create more mould. Keep fresh air moving in your home, as well as bright sunlight coming in through your windows. This will help reduce toxic mould.”

In other words, keep your eyes on your thermostat and be sure to open up the windows often enough that you’re allowing fresh air to circulate through each room. Stale and stagnant air doesn’t make for a mould-free home. On days when it’s particularly humid outside, you’ll want to take measures to keep the air inside of your home cool without keeping the windows open. In other words, there will be times when you need A/C.

How does air conditioning help? On HGTV.com, Dwight Barnett points out that “in the summer, a closed house with the air-conditioning turned off will have higher humidity levels than an air-conditioned home…If you had simply left the air conditioning running, it would have cooled the home and removed moisture from the air and circulated and filtered the air.” This is especially true for vacant houses. So, don’t skimp on the A/C if you’re planning a move.

The last thing you want is for your old house’s new inhabitants to complain that you left them with a mould-invested environment. “Moulds thrive when the humidity levels exceed 70 percent,” informs Barnett, “Because humidity levels vary from day to day, the thermostat should have been left at or below 74 degrees, and the fan should have been set to ‘On.’” You’ll also want to ensure that you’ve done some proper cleaning to remove any signs of mould.

What other ways can we avoid mould during the summer? Ensure that you’re repairing any leaks that may be occurring in your home. “If you find any moisture leaks, clean them up with a dry towel immediately and find the source of the leak,” advises Westaway Restorations, “Consider hiring a professional if the leak does not stop or if you are dealing with a plumbing issue…Controlling moisture leaks in your home or place of work will reduce the mould’s ability to thrive.”

How can our clothing encourage mould growth? Naturally, we have to wash our clothes. So they are bound to encounter moisture quite often. The key is to ensure that they are dried adequately. Don’t hang clothes in your closet that is still damp from the wash. Westaway Restorations also points out that leather shoes are excellent food sources for mould! Be sure to keep them clean and free of moisture.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we provide both Mould Assessment Services and Moisture Monitoring Services. We make it our mission to properly evaluate your property for moisture sources that may be causing the development of mould. Such sources may include envelop failures or leakage issues. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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How Does Condensation Impact Indoor Air Quality?

water drops on a blue glassDo you have a window condensation problem? You know when the windows of your home get all fogged up and covered in wet droplets? It looks like the glass is “sweating” and doesn’t make for the tidiest of environments. What’s worse is that all of that extra moisture in your home can be bad for your health. As we pointed out in our last blog, it’s important to try to reduce the amount of humidity in your home.

How does condensation occur? According to Tom Feiza on AshiReporter.org, “’Steam’ (condensation) occurs when invisible water vapour in the air condenses on the cool glass. Windows and metal window frames tend to be the coolest surfaces in our homes, so moisture forms there first — just like condensation beads up on the outside of your ice-cold lemonade glass in the summertime.”

So what’s the problem with condensation? RestorationsWindows.com reports that “warm, humid environments encourage the growth of moulds and fungi, which can lead to allergic reactions. Dry environments can irritate sinus linings and can progress to a sinus infection. The best way to combat this is to achieve the appropriate balance of temperature and moisture in your home.” Condensation, of course, indicates the presence of excess moisture.

So how do we resolve the condensation problem? There are many different ways to limit moisture in the home. Among them is doing away with your humidifiers and using dehumidifiers instead. As well, you may want to “limit plants, aquariums, and pets. If you care for a lot of plants, group them in one sunny room and avoid over watering,” says RestorationsWindows.com. You’ll also want to be careful about the types of appliances you use.

Feiza writes that certain types of heaters can not only add moisture to the home, but emit toxic gases as well. Neither of the two is good for your home’s indoor air quality. “Never use unvented fossil fuel-burning devices like kerosene heaters indoors,” he insists, “Burning fossil fuels creates carbon dioxide and water vapour, introducing excessive moisture into your home. It can also create dangerous carbon monoxide.”

RestorationsWindows.com agrees. The website warns that gas appliances require our special attention. “Have your gas appliances checked, if you have not recently,” advises the website, “Malfunctioning gas appliances can deliver excessive water vapour into the air along with more dangerous contaminants. Be sure you have a carbon monoxide alarm.” Other tips include air drying clothes outdoors only, eliminating plumbing leaks and storing firewood outside.

Is there anything else that can be done to limit condensation? As you may have guessed, good ventilation always helps. “Structural ventilation or attic ventilation removes moisture from the structure of your home,” writes Feiza, “Because moisture flows with air leaks and can push through many materials, general structural ventilation is important. Point-source ventilation removes moisture at specific sources.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer both Air Quality Services and Moisture Monitoring Services. Our team of experts work to ensure that all sources that negatively impact your home’s indoor air quality are discovered. Our inspections are designed to provide you with the best quality air possible in your homes. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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How Does Humidity Impact Indoor Air Quality?

The rising humidity rate level rising on a thermometer past 100 percent to tell you of danger or uncomfortable weather conditions in the hot summer heatFor a lot of Canadians, summer is a favourite time of the year. To many, nothing beats warm and sunny days, especially after what always seems to be a long and drawn-out winter. To many others, however, the summer isn’t all that it’s cracked up to be. When the sun is shining and the air is warm, there is often humidity. And with humidity comes difficulty breathing for those with allergies and asthma.

Sure, we can remain indoors and crank up the A/C. But no one likes staying cooped inside all summer long. What’s the fun in that? It’s important, of course, to control the humidity of our living and working spaces. As Coolray.com informs us, “when the temperatures warm up outside you can experience too much humidity in your home.” So it’s important to find ways to lower the levels of humidity at home.

What’s wrong with humidity in the home? Well, first of all, it doesn’t make for a comfortable living environment. As Theo Etzel points out on ConditionedAir.com, “moist air feels clammy and sticky, and dry air leaves you reaching for hydration. So, your level of comfort is affected by humidity.” He goes on to note that having either too much or too little humidity can also affect the structural damage of your home.

But how does humidity in the home affect our health? Humidity can cause condensation. And this excess moisture in the home can allow for the development of mould. The presence of mould, as you may already know, can send spores into the air that is detrimental to our respiratory systems. This is especially a problem for asthmatics. Coolray.com notes that there are other health hazards to having too much humidity in the home.

“High humidity can be especially dangerous when combined with high temperatures, as it will disrupt the body’s ability to cool itself, which may lead to a heat stroke,” reports the website, “People with heart problems or asthma are advised to be extremely careful during such conditions. Drier air provides comfort at higher temperatures, so homeowners can raise the setting on their central air conditioners thereby reducing their energy use.”

So what can be done to lower the humidity in our homes? Ventilation is the first step. Etzel writes that when homes are “tightly constructed”, they tend to retain more heat and moisture. Therefore, ventilation is especially important in order to minimize humidity levels. “If a home does not have the proper mechanical ventilation, excess water vapour can move through walls and ceilings, causing wet insulation, peeling paint, and mould on walls and woodwork,” he says.

Etzel also strongly recommends that you check your air conditioners to ensure that they are in proper working order. In some cases, you may even want to invest in a whole-house dehumidifier. “It operates in tandem with your central air conditioner to reduce mould and mildew, improve indoor air quality, extend the life of your A/C and help control your energy bills,” he informs us.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we highly recommend that you take advantage of our Moisture Monitoring Services. We evaluate your property for moisture sources that may be causing the development of mould. Such sources may include envelop failures or leakage issues. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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