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Taking A Look At Asbestos-Related Cancers

Back on December 30, 2018, the toxic substance known as asbestos was finally outlawed in Canada. To be specific, the federal government introduced The Prohibition of Asbestos and Products Containing Asbestos Regulations which prohibits the import, sale and use of asbestos as well as the manufacture, import, sale and use of products containing asbestos in Canada. There are, however, a limited number of exclusions.

In the months leading up to the official asbestos ban, we blogged pretty extensively about asbestos and the many health hazards that result due to exposure. As you’re surely aware, asbestos is a known cause of many different types of cancer.

Lung cancer.

It probably makes sense to begin with the obvious. We’re all aware of the irreversible damage that cigarette smoking can cause to our lungs. According to the Canadian Cancer Society, lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Canada. No less than 21,100 Canadians died from lung cancer in 2017, representing 26 percent of all cancer-related deaths that year.

Inhaling asbestos fibres can be as deadly as cigarette smoking. And when the two are combined, the end result is almost sure to be lethal. “Lung cancer is a malignant tumour that invades and blocks the lung’s air passages,” explains the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, “Smoking tobacco combined with asbestos exposure greatly increases the chance of developing lung cancer.”

Ovarian cancer.

This one may not be as obvious as lung cancer. According to Michelle Whitmer on Asbestos.com, researchers are still debating about how asbestos fibres reach the ovaries. However, they theorize that the fibres are transported by the lymphatic system.

“Though it only represents 3 percent of female cancer diagnoses, ovarian cancer causes more deaths than any other female reproductive cancer,” she reports, “In 2012, a study by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) confirmed that asbestos exposure causes ovarian cancer. Many cases were documented in women whose father or husband worked with asbestos.”

Ovarian Cancer Canada tells us that approximately 2,800 Canadian women are diagnosed with the disease each year. Ovarian cancer is the 5th most common cancer for women and is the most serious of all women’s cancer.

Laryngeal cancer.

Before asbestos gets to the lungs, it must pass through the esophagus. Whitmer writes that researchers believe inhaled asbestos fibres get lodged in the voice box before getting to the lungs. If caught early enough, radiation therapy can help cure and preserve a patient’s voice.

“Laryngeal cancer is rare and most often caused by smoking in combination with alcohol consumption,” informs Whitmer, “Yet a 2006 report sponsored by the National Institutes of Health proved that asbestos exposure causes cancer of the larynx, known as the voice box. In 2012 the IRAC confirmed the connection in a scientific review of all evidence to date.”

The DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team remains dedicated to helping Canadians remove asbestos from their homes and places of work. For information about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

And be sure to check out next week’s blog as we take a look at some other diseases that our caused by asbestos exposure!

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The Ever-Important Practice Of Preventing Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide is a colourless, tasteless and odourless gas. So why all the attention for something you can’t see, taste or smell? It’s lethal. Because it can’t be detected by our senses, carbon monoxide is a highly dangerous gas that has the ability to take lives. CO poisoning is definitely not an issue that should be taken lightly.

Rebecca Joseph of Global News reveals that, according to the Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs, more than 50 people die every year from carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada. The United States has a similar problem. “Unintentional carbon monoxide poisonings account for approximately 400 to 500 deaths (all ages) and more than 15,000 emergency department visits in the United States annually,” says HealthyChildren.org.

How can carbon monoxide poisoning be prevented?

The first step is the understanding of where carbon monoxide comes from. The poisonous gas is a by-product of appliances, heaters and automobiles that burn gasoline, natural gas, wood, oil, kerosene or propane. So it’s vital that all of the above mentioned contraptions are both used and maintained intelligently.

Francis Lavoie is a biologist at the Water and Air Quality Bureau department at Health Canada. “Whenever you burn something whether it’s wood, natural gas, oil, paper or propane, there’s CO produced,” he explains in Joseph’s article.

If you have fuel-burning appliances in your home, it’s vital that they are kept in good working order and checked by a professional regularly. Such appliances include gas water heaters, gas stoves and gas clothes dryers. “Gas cooking stove tops and ovens should not be used for supplemental heat,” insists HealthyChildren.org.

Be wary of fireplace use.

With the summer currently in full swing, this shouldn’t be a problem. But come winter, many Canadians greatly enjoy firing up their fireplaces in order to keep their homes warm and toasty. In truth, this can be a very hazardous practice, especially if the ventilation in your home is poor.

“Check to ensure the flue is open during operation,” says HealthyChildren.org, “Proper use, inspection, and maintenance of vent-free fireplaces (and space heaters) are recommended.” It’s also very important to clean your chimney. If it is blocked, you stand the chance of trapping CO gas in your home every time you light up the fireplace.

Warm up the car only when it’s outdoors.

Naturally, automobiles are kept outside…most of the time. Have you ever warmed your car up while it was still in the garage? This is a common wintertime practice for many Canadians – and it’s a dangerous one. Not only is it recommended that you regularly inspect and maintain your vehicle’s exhaust system, you should never leave your car running in the garage or any other enclosed space. As HealthyChildren.org warns us, “CO can accumulate even when a garage door is open.”

Preventing carbon monoxide poisoning is of major importance for all Canadians. Getting a CO detector should definitely be on your to-do list if you don’t have one already. At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Air Quality Services that detect indoor air quality problems including CO. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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Hoarding: An Arch Enemy To Indoor Air Quality

Here is some of the simplest advice we’ll ever be able to give you: keep your home clean! If you’re concerned about the air you breathe while you’re inside your home, it’s best to become a neat freak, of sorts. Dust, vacuum, mop, wipe – all of these practices will help you to breathe a little easier.

We admit, however, that being neat and tidy is a lot easier for some than others. Hoarders, of course, are the exact opposite of neat freaks. And to be fair, it’s important to understand that individuals who hoard are generally considered to have mental and emotional hardships. They feel the need to hold on to often-useless items for sentimental value. And, unfortunately, the practice of hoarding can bring about very serious health issues.

Poor indoor air quality.

No home inhabited by a hoarder is one that is safe for breathing. With a multitude of pollutants in the air, you’re unquestionably doing harm to your respiratory system when inside the home. Obviously, a hoarder is unable to unearth the dirt, grime, dust and mould from their homes’ surfaces as they are all covered up with objects. This makes it near impossible to improve the home’s air quality.

“The large amount of dust in hoarders’ homes and the odours and ammonia from decaying products cause serious indoor air quality issues and can result in various respiratory problems – chronic coughing, shortness of breath, inflammation of the lungs, etc.,” explains Luke Armstrong on RestorationMasterFinder.com, “Clutter can even fall on air vents and/or block other airways, causing lack of oxygen and raising the carbon dioxide levels in the house.”

Pest infestation.

If you’ve ever seen an episode of the A&E series, “Hoarders”, you’ve undoubtedly caught gruesome glimpses of homes that are infested with bugs and even rodents. Both the messes and the waste these creatures leave behind create an environment that is virtually toxic.

“Cockroaches, rats, flies, and other pests are attracted to rotting food and animal waste products,” explains Rainbow International Restoration, “A severe hoarding situation can become a haven for pests that spread diseases to the people and animals living in these unsanitary conditions.”

Mould problems.

Our blog has often discussed the health issues that mould can trigger. Combining the stale air produced from a hoarder’s clutter with the high level of humidity that often results from leaky pipes hidden behind all that clutter, you get the perfect situation for mould growth. Not to mention, the spoiled food that is often present in a hoarder’s home adds to the mould infestation problem.

When kept in the home for months, says Armstrong, rotten food can harbour mildew and fungus growth. “This inevitably results in a severe mould problem that can cause substantial structural damage and serious health issues – mould can trigger allergies, damage the respiratory system, and aggravate existing health conditions,” he writes.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we know how important it is for the air in your home to be pollutant-free. If you have issues with hoarding or if you’re living with a hoarder, your health is at risk. We would highly recommend a major clean up of your home with the help of professionals, followed up with an indoor air quality inspection.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us to learn more about our Air Quality Services. Give us a call at 1-855-668-3131 or email us at info@dftechnical.ca.

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What Steps Can Be Taken To Prevent Lung Cancer?

Lung cancer has taken the lives of far too many people. In fact, Lung Cancer Canada reports that, in 2015, approximately 26,600 Canadians were diagnosed with lung cancer with an estimated 20,900 likely to die from it. Lung cancer is the most common cancer among Canadians and more people die from it than breast cancer, colorectal cancer and prostate cancer combined. It couldn’t be a more obvious statement to say that lung cancer should be avoided at all costs.

Nevertheless, there are still many Canadians who continue to smoke cigarettes. The death-inducing activity is the single most preventable cause of cancer and is responsible for about 30 percent of all cancer-related deaths. Needless to say, cigarette smoking should be abolished from your life. Even if you’ve never smoked a cigarette before, it is imperative you avoid secondhand smoke at all times.

There are numerous other ways to avoid getting lung cancer. There are a number of simple steps we can all take, in addition to eliminating cigarette smoke from our lives. Will you take them?

Stick to a regular exercise routine.

You’d be hard pressed to locate any health-based literature that doesn’t recommend exercise. In addition to the many health benefits you may already be aware of – weight loss being the most popular – regular exercise is a known deterrent to lung cancer.

According to lung cancer physician, Dr. Lynne Eldridge on VeryWellHealth.com, “even moderate amounts of exercise can aid in lung cancer prevention. Studies suggest that even something as simple as gardening twice a week is associated with a lower risk of developing lung cancer.”

Have a steady intake of fruits and veggies.

Also on every standard list of nutritional tips is the consumption of plant-based foods. Whether you like them or not, fruits and vegetables are good for you. It’s that simple. But don’t assume you have to stick to greens only. Dr. Eldridge highly recommends choosing from a “rainbow of colours” by suggesting “dark greens such as spinach and broccoli, the whites of onions, the reds of apples and tomatoes, and the orange of orange juice.”

“A diet rich in fruits in vegetables is linked with a lower risk of developing lung cancer,” she informs us, “Recently, studies suggest that variety may be even more important than quantity. Make lung cancer prevention fun by trying out new foods in the produce section…On a reverse note, inorganic phosphates found in processed meats and cheeses are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer.”

Choose your booze wisely.

It’s the summertime. And where there are summertime celebrations, there are libations. You may assume that since drinking doesn’t have anything to do with your respiratory system, the consumption of alcohol won’t impact your risk of getting lung cancer. Think again. However, take some solace in knowing that some alcoholic beverages are better for your health than others.

Dr. Eldridge tells us that “for men, the heavy consumption of beer and hard liquor is associated with an elevated risk of developing lung cancer. In contrast, a moderate intake of wine in men was linked with a lower risk of developing the disease.”

The team at DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. would love to help you in your quest to avoid lung cancer. For information about how our Air Quality Services can help you to vastly improve your home’s indoor air quality, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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What Is Radon And How Can It Impact Our Health?

Radon is one weird gas. But it’s not weird because of its smell – because you can’t smell it. It doesn’t look funny – because you can’t see it. However, radon can cause some serious health problems for you and your family if it is found in concentrated doses in your home.

The invisible, odourless and tasteless gas is created when the uranium in soil and rock breaks down. Now, you may be thinking, “there’s no soil or rock in my home!” But radon gets even weirder. You see, outside, the gas is practically harmless. But it doesn’t stay outside. It can seep into your home through cracks and collect in tight spaces. It’s important, therefore, to safeguard your home against radon.

Just how dangerous is radon exposure?

It’s bad. Simply put, long-term exposure to radon can cause lung cancer. The risk of a person getting cancer from radon inhalation depends on the level of radon and how long that person is exposed to it in concentrated levels.

According to the Government of Nova Scotia, “the Canadian guideline is based on an exposure period of about 70 years spent in a dwelling that contains elevated levels of radon 75% of that time. Other than lung cancer, there is no evidence that radon exposure causes other harmful health effects such as any other form of cancer, respiratory diseases such as asthma, or symptoms such as persistent coughing or headaches.”

If you’re a cigarette smoker, your chances of getting lung cancer significantly increase.

A year ago, we posted a blog entitled “Radon + Cigarettes = A Deadly Combination”. We’re not sure we can make it much clearer than that! While cigarette smokers are already at a high risk of getting lung cancer, exposure to radon gas can make the risk much higher.

“Exposure to radon and tobacco use together can significantly increase your risk of lung cancer,” informs the Government of Canada website, “For example, if you are a lifelong smoker your risk of getting lung cancer is 1 in 10. If you add long term exposure to a high level of radon, your risk becomes 1 in 3. On the other hand, if you are a non-smoker, your lifetime lung cancer risk at the same high radon level is 1 in 20.”

Can radon get in our drinking water?

It can. However, the Government of Nova Scotia tells us that research has found radon in drinking water to be far less harmful than the radon gas we breathe in. As a result, there is no Canadian guideline for radon in drinking water.

“When the ground produces radon, it can dissolve and accumulate in water from underground sources, such as wells,” their site reports, “When water that contains radon is agitated when used for daily household requirements radon gas escapes from the water and goes into the air. The health risk is not from ingestion but from radon inhalation.”

It is highly recommended that radon tests be conducted at least every two years. At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we provide Radon Services that are designed to determine the precise levels of radon in your home or office to see if they are safe or not. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131. You can also email us at info@dftechnical.ca.

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How To Perform An Effective Summer Cleaning Session

We’ve all heard of spring cleaning. It’s the time of year when winter transitions into spring and we all feel the need to clear ourselves of the muck that winter tends to bring into our homes. Furthermore, we all enjoy the idea of cracking open those windows for fresh air – a practice we tend to ignore during the coldest months of the season. The idea of being “fresh” helps to inspire our spring cleaning routines.

Who says we can’t summer clean? With the advent of this wonderful new season, we’re all presented with the perfect opportunity to give our homes another freshening up. Spring cleaning and summer cleaning are similar in that they’re both actions that work to eliminate dirt and clutter. However, there are some differences. Let’s review a few important ways to ensure you’re performing an effective summer cleaning routine.

Deodorize your trash with baking soda.

During the summer, it may not be enough to simply take out the trash. This is especially true if you’re the type of person to house your filled garbage bags in the garage or in the backyard until it’s time for pick up. By using baking soda as a deodorizer, you will spare your family the horrid smells that the combination of extreme heat and garbage create!

“Sprinkling baking soda at the bottom of a trashcan will keep odours at bay–especially helpful if you have cans in a hot garage or porch,” informs Saudia Davis of HuffPost, “Using trash bags? Wad up old newspaper and put in the bottom of the bag–this will not only help absorb odour, but will keep the bag from leaking due to discarded liquid products.”

Don’t forget the outside stuff.

What happens to our patio furniture, swing sets, barbeques, porches and other outdoor elements of our home during the winter? They get buried in snow, battered with other precipitation and wind and essentially become havens for dirt and grime until the summertime arrives. Clean them before using them!

“Scrub the deck and driveway,” advises Debra Ronca on HowStuffWorks.com, “Clean the grill and make sure you have enough propane or charcoal for impromptu barbeques. Wipe down your patio furniture regularly to keep pollen at a minimum. Disinfect and hose out your garbage cans. If you have kids, hose down their outdoor play sets — inspecting and adjusting them for safety, too.”

Clean your blinds with an old pair of socks.

Davis offers this very interesting piece of summer cleaning advice. We admit, upon first glance, it inspired somewhat of a double take. However, it’s a great idea! All too often, we use dusters to remove the dust from our blinds. However, all this does is move the dust around. It’s important to completely eliminate dust by using a damp cloth. We suppose an old pair of socks works just as well! Davis highlights why this is an important summertime routine.

“With more hours of sunlight, you may be noticing the dust that has accumulated on your blinds,” she writes, “Grab a pair of old socks to help you clean your blinds. Mix equal parts of water and vinegar in a bowl, put a sock over one hand, dip it into the mixture and run it over the blinds. Use the other sock to wipe away the dampness.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we’re committed to helping you enjoy a cleaner home this summer. For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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3 Simple Steps To Breathing Easier In Your Home This Summer

We’re just two days away from the official start of summer! It’s an exciting time, isn’t it? Warm and sunny days mean that people all over Canada will be venturing outside more often. And what happens when people venture outside more often? They track dirt into their homes more often!

So what to do about all of that tracked-in dirt this summer? It’s important to take steps to ensuring that your home is kept clean in order to improve its indoor air quality. The health benefits are many. So even if you plan on going outside to get more fresh air this summer, it will remain important to take some simple steps to breathe easier in your home as well.

Here are three:

1. Steam clean your floors.

Believe us – simple sweeping won’t cut it. For truly clean floors, you can’t just rely on brooms or Swiffer mops. Vacuuming will remove a lot of particles from your floor, however, you won’t necessarily eliminate the bacteria left behind. Steam cleaning ensures that the extreme heat used to mop the floor kills all that bacteria.

As Hamilton, Ontario’s Clean Air Solutions informs us, “mops pick up dust and pollutants that vacuuming and dusting might miss or leave behind. Make sure to use a non-toxic soap in your mop water. Steam cleaners are also available for hard floors. They are a great alternative to mopping, as they use hotter temperatures, which can also help kill bacteria and allergens without needing any soaps or cleaners.”

2. Set up houseplants throughout the home.

Sometimes, it’s a good thing to bring the outdoors inside. This is especially true when you’re talking about plants. Houseplants are known for their air purifying ways. To ensure that your home and all of its inhabitants get extra doses of oxygen throughout the summer, invest in some toxin-destroying plants such as English Ivy and aloe vera.

“The benefits of houseplants cannot be overstated,” insists Stewart Unsdorfer Northeast Ohio’s Central Heating & Air Conditioning, “Houseplants clean the air. Houseplants actually breathe. They take in carbon dioxide and breathe out oxygen. People and animals take in oxygen and breathe out carbon dioxide. By bringing plants into your home, you’re creating a symbiotic relationship, filtering the air, creating fresh oxygen, and beautifying your home.”

3. Don’t clean with harsh chemicals.

We get it. They smell nice. But those scents are indications that you’ve used chemical-laden cleaning products to freshen up your home. The problem, Clean Air Solutions reminds us, is that many cleaning products contain harsh solvents or emit toxic odours.

“Opt to make your own natural cleaners, or buy 100% natural cleaners,” they recommend, “Many modern scented candles and other air fresheners release toxins into the air and can be especially harmful to pets. Avoid using air fresheners, or opt for 100% natural fresheners like essential oils and soy or beeswax based candles.”

The DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team is committed to helping you enjoy top-of-the-line indoor air quality this summer! For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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Protecting Yourself From Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide is also known as the “silent killer”. That’s because it’s a gas that cannot be seen, smelled or tasted. And since it is invisible, odourless and tasteless, CO is the cause of more than 50 deaths in Canada each year, according to the Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs, as reported by Rebecca Joseph of Global News.

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headaches, nausea, dizziness, shortness of breath and flu-like symptoms. However, for the vast majority of us, when feeling such symptoms, we don’t assume that CO is the cause.

How is carbon monoxide produced?

“CO is produced anytime a fuel is burned,” explains Kidde Canada, “Potential sources include gas or oil furnaces, water heaters, space heaters, clothes dryers, barbecue grills, fireplaces, wood-burning stoves, gas ovens, generators, and car exhaust fumes.” Their website goes on to reveal that, according to Statistics Canada, 64 percent of Canadians use natural gas, oil, wood and wood pellets or propane as their home’s major heat source.

What that means is most of us are more susceptible to CO poisoning than we may assume. This is especially true if you have an idling vehicle in your home’s attached garage. Even with the garage door opened, carbon monoxide can become trapped in concentrated amounts.

What are some ways to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning?

As if this wasn’t already made clear, don’t leave your car running while it’s in your garage. The CO produced by the car can easily seep into your home. As well, don’t heat your home using ovens or stoves. What may seem like an absolutely ridiculous idea is a practice that some people have used during the winter in lieu of turning up the heat.

“Do not use charcoal or gas grills inside or operate outdoors near a window where CO fumes could seep in,” advises Kidde Canada, “Have a licensed professional inspect heating systems and other fuel-burning appliances annually. Install fuel-burning appliances properly and operate them according to the manufacturer’s instructions.”

What is the best way to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning?

In truth, there is only one way to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning in your home: a carbon monoxide detector. As mentioned, CO can’t be seen, smelled or tasted, so there’s no way to tell if it has become concentrated in your home. You certainly don’t want to guess as to whether or not your home has a potential problem. Simply put, getting a carbon monoxide detector should be at the top of your to-do list.

“A carbon monoxide detector is the best way to protect you and your family from this potentially deadly threat,” insists the Canada Safety Council, “Install CO alarms where they can be easily heard, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. When installing a CO alarm, always follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Test CO alarms at least once a month and replace batteries according to manufacturer’s instructions.”

Protection against carbon monoxide poisoning is a serious matter for all Canadians. At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we offer Air Quality Services that detect indoor air quality problems including CO. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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The Importance Of Eliminating Secondhand Smoke From Your Life

Smoking is nasty. We apologize if this offends anyone who still smokes cigarettes, but we feel it’s important to be honest. Especially when that honesty may have a role in protecting people’s health, it’s something we’re willing to share. Smoking isn’t just nasty because it smells bad, stains your teeth and ages a person well beyond his/her years – although that should all be enough to get a smoker to quit – it’s literally nasty because it’s a killer.

You certainly don’t have to be reminded of how harmful cigarette smoke is to your health.

By today’s standards, that’s old news. But here’s a quick refresher: cigarette smoking is a known cause of lung cancer (among other cancers) and kills nearly 40,000 Canadians a year. Not to rehash our potentially offensive approach to this topic, but smoking cigarettes – when you really think about it – is pretty crazy.

“Smoking is the No. 1 preventable cause of death in Canada and kills more than 37,000 Canadians each year – six times more than vehicle collisions, suicides, murders and AIDS combined,” reports Medisys.ca, “Many people who smoke say they smoke to relieve stress, or smoke more when they are experiencing stress.”

What about the stress endured by the non-smoker?

By that, we mean to highlight the many negative implications of inhaling secondhand smoke. Yes, cigarettes are so lethal, you don’t even have to smoke them to suffer the consequences of their existence. Non-smokers who are around smokers during their partaking in their nasty habits are just as susceptible to a variety of cancers as the smokers themselves.

“There is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke,” informs Cancer.net, “Even brief moments around secondhand smoke can harm a person’s health. And the risk of health problems is greater with more exposure.” The website goes on to explain that research suggests “that secondhand smoke exposure may increase the risk of other cancers by at least 30%. These include cervical cancer, kidney cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer, rectal cancer, and brain tumors.”

How can you eliminate secondhand smoke from your life?

Perhaps contrary to the opening paragraph of this week’s blog, it’s best to take the polite approach. After all, cigarette smokers are not bad people. They’re simply people with bad addictions. You’re well within your rights to inform them that you do not want cigarette smoke in your home or anywhere around your person. Just be nice about it!

Laura Nathan-Garner of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center offers no less than nine polite ways to say “don’t smoke around me”. With the help of her friends and Facebook followers, she provides some great examples. The following is from Janet P.

“People don’t like being told what to do so I don’t tell them they cannot smoke around me. If they light up, I simply say ‘I don’t like to be around cigarette smoke. I’ll wait for you over here.’ Then I move myself away. They are less likely to take offense and usually will accommodate my decision by either not smoking or by moving away themselves.”

A smoke-free home will greatly improve its indoor air quality.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we’d like to help you with that! For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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4 Reminders Of How To Improve Your Home’s Indoor Air Quality

There are some things in life that just insist upon being repeated. “Look both ways before you cross the street” comes to mind. It didn’t matter how adamant we were on implementing this rule as kids, our parents always offered us this warning when we left the house, didn’t they?

Well, speaking of your house, it’s a location that the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team consider to be extremely important. Actually, which location in your life could be more important than the place where you sleep every night and spend the majority of your time? The way we see it, it’s vital that we remind you of some easy ways to improve your home’s indoor air quality.

Here are four reminders:

1. Crack your windows open.

We have a number of full blogs dedicated to this very tip. And with summer on its way, it can’t be reiterated any stronger. You may have had an excuse all winter long to keep your windows shut. We get it – it was cold! But opening the windows during the year’s warmest months will help to air out pollutants and welcome in fresh air.

“Keeping your windows closed traps irritants indoors,” explains HousewifeHowTos.com, “When the temperatures are mild, open windows on opposite sides of your home to create a cross-draft to quickly freshen your indoor air.”

2. Dust with a microfiber cloth.

Traditional dusters simply move dust particles around. A microfiber cloth, on the other hand, traps dust and removes it from surfaces. As HousewifeHowTos.com explains, “feather dusters and Swiffer dusters don’t do a good job getting rid of fine particles. Use damp microfiber cloths, instead, and rinse them often. That way, you aren’t just moving the dust around — you’re getting it out of your home.”

3. Take your shoes off at the door.

Oh, it’s so very Canadian to remove your shoes at the door, isn’t it? But, as Canadians, we find it hard to believe this isn’t a universal rule. Outside surfaces are dirty – let’s just be honest about it. Why would you want to track in the dirt, grass, gum and whatever else is on the ground out there into the house? Nevertheless, many of our south-of-the-border counterparts tell us they keep their shoes on in the house. Trust us on this one – stay Canadian and take off your shoes at the door!

“Who knows what’s on the bottom of your shoes, so be sure everyone removes shoes when coming at the home,” says Rachel Brougham on FamilyHandyman.com, “Use a boot tray or shoe rack to collect dirt, pesticides and other pollutants from making their way into your home.”

4. Get your home tested for radon.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we provide Radon Services that are designed to determine the precise levels of the colourless and odourless gas in your home and whether or not they are safe. Radon testing can mean the difference between life and death so it is highly recommended that radon tests be conducted at least every two years.

For more information about our Radon Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131. You can also email us at info@dftechnical.ca.

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