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Asthma

Avoiding Asthma And Allergy Symptom Triggers While At Home

To all asthmatics and allergy sufferers, we hope that you’ve been experiencing a symptom-free spring so far. For many of you, a complete avoidance of any allergy symptoms during the spring is unlikely. And with summer coming up in a little over a month, pollen, dust, ragweed and the like aren’t bound to let up.

As a result, it’s important that you take measures to protect your lungs from the usual suspects. And, believe it or not, this goes double when you’re in the house. You may assume that avoiding nature is a great way to prevent your allergies from acting up, but it’s important to remember that your home is filled with allergens as well.

What can asthmatics and allergy sufferers do to avoid symptom triggers while at home?

Eliminate the presence of cigarette smoke at all costs.

If you have asthma or suffer from allergies, you likely stay clear from cigarettes. However, you’re also likely to have friends or family members who smoke. Put them on high alert that under no circumstances is cigarette smoking permitted in your home. Make no mistake about it. Cigarettes are killers. We all know they’re cancer-causing. But for many asthma sufferers, the smoke from cigarettes is so unbearable, it feels like they’re being choked to death!

“Staying smoke and scent free is an easy way to improve the air quality in your home or workplace,” Asthma.ca reminds us, “Cigarette smoke, wood smoke, and scented products like candles, flowers, perfumes, cleaning supplies, and laundry products can all be asthma triggers. You have the power to keep these triggers out of your indoor spaces.”

Dust and clean your home regularly.

It sounds like a no-brainer to keep your home clean, but you may be surprised to know how quickly dust accumulates. Missing a week of cleaning is as good as inviting an asthma attack – depending, of course, on how severe your asthma is. As Chin Chin of Dengarden.com points out, when dust accumulates in the home, chemicals and allergens accumulate as well.

“Sweep or use a vacuum cleaner to get rid of dust on the floor and carpets at least two times a week,” she recommends, “Choose a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter to make sure that the dust doesn’t get blown back from the exhaust and don’t forget to wash the filter. Mop the floor with plain water afterward to pick up the dust left behind by the vacuum or broom.”

Beware of volatile organic compounds.

Volatile organic compounds (or VOCs, for short) are found in a lot of consumer products. In addition to cigarettes, they are also found in paints, glues, cleaners, disinfectants, air fresheners and adhesives. You’ll notice that a few of the products mentioned are often used to clean and disinfect your home. In reality, such products – the ones that actually smell pretty nice – are causing more harm than good.

“Chemical fumes from products like paints, cleaners, scented cosmetics, and laundry supplies can all trigger an asthma attack or worsening of symptoms,” informs Asthma.ca, “Look for products with the asthma & allergy friendly™ certification program logo to find products that have been scientifically tested and proven to be more suitable for people with asthma and allergies.”

The DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team is committed to helping you avoid asthma and allergy symptom triggers all year round. For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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Never Underestimate The Importance Of Vacuuming

We get it. Chores aren’t exactly fun. Activities such as dusting, mopping, washing the dishes, doing the laundry and vacuuming can be made a lot more entertaining if you put on some music. Make it a party! Dance and get some always-needed exercise while doing your chores and your regular cleaning routines won’t seem so mundane.

If the whole “party while you tidy” thing doesn’t work for you, then perhaps it’s best you take a more intense look at the health implications that can ensue when you don’t clean up regularly. Vacuuming, in particular, is especially vital to your health. Believe it or not, the removal of dust, dirt and other home contaminants is essential in preventing respiratory problems and the onset of allergy symptoms.

There is more than just dust in your carpets!

Sure, dust can make you sneeze and cough. But when you’re not vacuuming your carpets (where dust easily accumulates) on a regular basis, you’re inviting unwanted visitors into your home – literally. Dust mites and other microorganisms feed off of the skin you shed every day. You may not notice it, but you shed a lot of skin all day long.

“A human sheds over 1 million skin cells per hour,” reveals Jason Roberts on an infographic provided by VacuumsGuide.com, “Every year, these mingle with airborne dust (soil particles) and accumulate to several pounds into carpets, rugs and furniture. They provide a great developing environment for lots of dangerous microorganisms.”

California-based professional carpet cleaners, Chem-Dry of Fair Oaks/Folsom corroborates this point. “When a carpet is not cleaned regularly, microorganisms tend to grow quickly and this can become an issue for those who are sensitive to allergens or who have asthma,” reads their website, “Dust particles and other micro substances that can become clogged within the fibres of the carpet can get stirred up and airborne every time someone walks across the room.”

Do you eat in the living room?

If so, you’re like most Canadians. It’s fun to plop in front of the television to watch the game or catch up on your favourite show during dinner time. And for everyone who partakes in the popular “watch while you eat” routine, it’s important to know just how dirty your floors are!

You may think you picked up every rice grain. You may assume you’ve swept up all of the crumbs. But living room eaters always leave food behind. And food in your carpets equals an illness waiting to happen.

“Dropped food is wasted food,” Roberts insists, “There is no 3 second, 5 second or 7 second rule. Dropped food gets infected with bacteria instantly…you could get Salmonella, Campylobacter, E-coli or several other viruses that will affect your digestive system.”

There are two things to draw from this information. 1) Never eat food that drops on the floor and 2) Vacuum the carpets of rooms you eat in right after eating!

How clean is your home?

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we’d like to help you get a much better understanding of how clean your home really is. Assessing its air quality is a great step towards ensuring better health for all who live in it. For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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How To Improve Indoor Air Quality When You Have A Pet

There are two types of people in this world. Those who can’t live without their pets and those who want nothing to do with animals. The former group are made up of a wide variety of dog and cat lovers as well as enthusiasts of all types of birds and fish. The latter group incorporates a lot of individuals who much prefer clean and tidy homes without the worry of having to constantly vacuum and sweep up hair and droppings.

“My brother’s dog sheds like crazy,” mentioned one of our colleagues in a conversation earlier this week, “He loves that dog but I can’t even stand petting it. Its fur just sheds all over the place. It’s on everything. And when I leave his house, it’s all over me! I just don’t know how he lives like that.”

What makes pet dander such a big deal?

A house full of dog hair is much more than an unsightly mess. It’s also a cause for concern as far as our breathing is concerned. It should be noted, however, that pet fur and dander aren’t the same thing. As Hamilton, Ontario’s Clean Air Solutions explains, dander is small particles of dead skin that falls off our pets. And they are known allergens.

“Pet allergens (dander, mite waste, etc.) can cause numerous respiratory problems,” informs their site, “The most common problem associated with pet dander is asthma. Occasionally, allergens can cause skin conditions such as eczema. Many people have mild allergic reactions to pet dander, but others can have life threatening complications.”

How can pet-friendly homes be made allergen-free?

To minimize the frequency of allergic reactions and asthma symptoms in your pet-friendly home, it will be important to adopt neat freak-like tendencies. Naturally, regularly cleaning will help. This includes vacuuming areas where your pet likes to hang out and removing excess dander and hair from your sofas and even your clothing. Be sure to dust and wipe furniture and other surfaces as well. And, of course, you’ll want to keep your pet as clean as possible.

“Maintaining a regular grooming schedule for your pets helps reduce dander in your home,” advises JD’s A/C in Longview, Texas, “Bath your pets every week or two, and brush them at least once every other day. You can also use special cat dander wipes to remove dander from your cat. When you groom your pet, you’ll remove much of the dander from its coat as well as loose hair that can circulate through your home and worsen your air quality.”

Where can pet dander be found?

Pet hair and dander can literally be found everywhere. We’re talking about under the sofa and chair cushions, in your bedding and underneath the beds, inside of closets, along the baseboards, in air ducts and even in the cracks and crevices of your flooring and walls.

If you or anyone else in your home suffers from allergies or your notice your guests are having breathing issues, it’s best to get your home’s air quality tested. The DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team offers Air Quality Services, so please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca to find out how to take advantage of them!

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Preventing Your Allergies From Acting Up This Spring

It’s official! Spring is here! Well, technically speaking, the start of the spring season gets underway at 3:58 p.m. Mountain Time today. With a high somewhere around the 15 degrees Celsius mark in Calgary today, the signs of spring have already arrived! For most Canadians, this is amazing news. For many others, however, it’s the beginning of a nightmare.

Do you suffer from seasonal allergies? If so, you’re likely part of the latter “nightmare” group. Dust, pollen, ragweed and a myriad of other allergy irritants are known for rearing their ugly heads when the springtime rolls around. As a result, many allergy sufferers feel forced to resort to a variety of medications and changes to their daily routines. If this sounds like you, bear in mind that there are a number of ways to prevent your allergies from acting up this spring.

Add alternative remedies to your medications.

If you’re not particularly a big fan of taking meds, you’re not alone. Each and every day, more Canadians adopt natural remedies for their illnesses. Such solutions are often as simple as making dietary changes. So, while many of your prescriptions and over-the-counter medicines may be necessary to help you battle your allergies, Reader’s Digest suggests that you add some alternative remedies to your allergy-fighting routines.

As their website informs, “the following alternative remedies, when paired with your regular antihistamine, may relieve allergy symptoms: a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement that includes magnesium, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and all the B vitamins; a cup of peppermint or chamomile tea each night before bed; or a daily dose of echinacea taken two weeks on, two weeks off.”

Discover your town’s pollen count.

If you’re one of the many Canadians who suffer from allergic reactions to pollen, it’s important that you become aware of the pollen count in your area. On VeryWellHealth.com, Dr. Daniel More informs readers about pollen counts and explains how they are obtained.

“Most pollen counters are placed on the tops of buildings, where they collect air samples through various methods,” he explains, “The pollen in the air lands on some type of surface, such as a glass microscope slide that has been coated with petroleum jelly. A person trained in pollen identification examines the slide under a microscope, and the amounts of different types of pollen are counted.”

Change your air conditioning filters.

Over the course of winter, it is likely your air conditioner stayed dormant. As a result, it is also likely that it accumulated a lot of dust. Before you fire up the air conditioning on a particularly warm day, be sure to clean or change your AC’s filters. The last thing you want is to spread all of that accumulated dust throughout your home.

“It’s important to change filters every three months and use filters with a MERV rating of 8 to 12,” advises Reader’s Digest, “A MERV rating tells you how well the filter can remove pollen and mould from the air as it passes through.”

The DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team is committed to helping you prevent your allergies from acting up this spring. For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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The Importance Of Avoiding Secondhand Smoke At All Costs

In a recent conversation with a colleague, we received some insight into what it’s like to live with asthma. This isn’t to say we weren’t already aware of the dangers of smoking for asthmatics. After all, cigarettes are deadly for all of us. But after hearing our friend speak of his experiences with breathing issues related to cigarette smoke, we felt it necessary to communicate how important it is for us all to avoid secondhand smoke at all costs.

“I can’t even smell it,” our colleague informed us, “If you go outside to smoke and come back in and I smell it on you, I’ll start coughing. It’s unbearable. I literally don’t know how people do it. You couldn’t get me to smoke a cigarette for a million dollars. I’d literally die before I finished it.”

What can non-smokers do to avoid secondhand smoke?

“Put all of your friends who are smokers on alert,” says our colleague, “If my friends plan on lighting up, they make sure to do so away from me. To be honest, I don’t ever have them over to my home because I just can’t have smoke anywhere around me. And when I visit them, they always go outside. Believe me, I appreciate it.”

It’s important to point out that our asthmatic friend doesn’t have the breathing issues he had when he as a child. As a kid, he experienced wheezing and coughing fits due to such irritants as pollen and ragweed. His last major asthma attack took place during a camping trip in Grade 4. However, as an adult, his asthma is all but gone. That is, of course, unless he smells smoke.

You don’t have to be asthmatic for secondhand smoke to impact you.

“Secondhand smoke exposure contributes to approximately 41,000 deaths among nonsmoking adults and 400 deaths in infants each year,” reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Secondhand smoke causes stroke, lung cancer, and coronary heart disease in adults. Children who are exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome, acute respiratory infections, middle ear disease, more severe asthma, respiratory symptoms, and slowed lung growth.”

The Monday Campaigns is a global movement backed by leading public health schools that dedicates the first day of every week to health. On their website, they point out that secondhand smoke releases more than 7,000 harmful chemicals into the air. To reiterate, cigarette smoke is dangerous for all us, not just those with respiratory issues.

Keep your home strictly smoke-free.

If you’re a non-smoker trying to avoid secondhand smoke, there is no simpler advice. Keep cigarette smoke out of your home. As our colleague mentioned, he won’t even let someone who has recently smoked a cigarette to enter his home. While this may seem harsh for some people, it’s a necessity if you wish to completely avoid the health hazards associated with cigarette smoking.

Kentucky’s St. Elizabeth Healthcare encourages people to ask their friends not to smoke around them. “It may be an awkward conversation at first, but it’s important to help your friend understand that while you love spending time together, you can’t be around him when he smokes,” they say on their website, “Be caring and understanding, but be firm.”

Unquestionably, a smoke-free home will vastly improve its indoor air quality. At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we’d like to help you take things a step further. For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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Why A Houseplant Would Make The Perfect Holiday Gift

We all now have less than two weeks to complete our Christmas shopping! While many of us may have already checked off everything on our shopping lists, there are so many more of us who still have special people in our lives to buy gifts for. It’s a wondrous time of year…but it’s an expensive one as well! It can also be frustrating when getting stumped for what to buy for our loved ones.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we consider the houseplant to be part of a special “can’t go wrong” category of gifts. While not everyone is necessarily a fan of houseplants, they have been proven to provide both elegance to any room and, more importantly, health benefits to anyone in their vicinity.

Houseplants are known air purifiers.

As Elizabeth Palermo explains on LiveScience.com, studies conducted by a number of institutions including NASA, Pennsylvania State University and the University of Georgia concluded that plants are great at absorbing potentially harmful gases through the pores on the surfaces of their leaves. While this ability is necessary for the photosynthesis process, it also helps to improve the air we breathe.

“Scientists studying the air-purification capacities of indoor plants have found that plants can absorb many other gases in addition to carbon dioxide, including a long list of volatile organic compounds (VOCs),”reveals Palermo, “Benzene (found in some plastics, fabrics, pesticides and cigarette smoke) and formaldehyde (found in some cosmetics, dish detergent,fabric softener and carpet cleaner) are examples of common indoor VOCs that plants help eliminate.”

Air pollutants are linked to numerous respiratory illnesses.

Palermo goes on to note that VOCs and other indoor air pollutants are linked to such conditions as asthma and nausea as well as chronic diseases such as cancer. When adding a houseplant to your living environment,you allow for it to remove harmful compounds from the air.

Among the plants that are the most useful in removing VOCs from the air are Japanese royal ferns, spider plants, Boston ferns, purple waffle plants, English Ivy, areca palms, golden pothos, aloe vera, snake plants and peace lilies, reports Palermo.

BoothbayGreenhouses.com goes into greater detail about several of these air purifying plants and also adds Chrysanthemum, Devil’s Ivy, Red-edged Dracaena, Lady Palm, Flamingo Lily, Barberton Daisy and Weeping Fig to the list of houseplants that improve indoor air quality. The information provided about English Ivy, which is also known as Hedera helix, is especially enlightening.

What are the health benefits provided by English Ivy?

“According to NASA’s Clean Air Study, English Ivy is effective at cleansing benzene, formaldehyde, xylene and toluene from the air,” explains the website, “Additionally, other studies have indicated that English Ivy also helps reduce mould in your home. This evergreen climbing vine is extremely popular in outdoor landscaping. You may have seen it used as ground-cover in areas where grass doesn’t grow, or perhaps climbing up the side of a wall or tree trunk.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we may not sell houseplants, but we would still like to offer you and your family the gift of clean air inside your home this holiday season. For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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How Being Clean And Tidy Is Good For Your Health

Some people classify themselves as “neat freaks”. It’s important to them that they have all of their personal possessions kept in neat, organized fashions, their homes are constantly dusted and vacuumed and that their kitchens and bathrooms are kept immaculate. There’s a lot that goes into being a neat freak. Those of us who really have it bad can’t stand the sight of a speck of dust!

However, an argument can be made that those of us who “have it bad” actually have it pretty good. Keeping a neat and tidy home isn’t just pleasant on the eyes, but it’s good for your health as well. It probably goes without saying that the more dust and dirt you eliminate from your home, the lesser your chances are of contracting some sort of bacterial infection. But the benefits of cleanliness extend beyond well that.

A dirty home is likely to trigger asthma symptoms.

Dust, mould and pet dander – these are common household irritants for those who have asthma and allergies. Anyone with respiratory issues knows just how dangerous these seemingly harmless examples of a dirty home can be. On ApartmentTherapy.com, Cambria Bold explains that asthma and allergy triggers are one of three categories of indoor pollutants that have the potential to cause serious health problems.

“Common household triggers include mould, dust mites, pollen, secondhand smoke, and pet dander,” she writes, “At any given time a home may have mould growing on a shower curtain, dust mites in soft textiles like pillows, blankets or stuffed animals, and cat and dog hair on the floor and upholstery.”

Don’t make your home dirtier by cleaning it.

How exactly can you make a home dirtier by cleaning it? Well, it all depends on what you’re using to clean. Many household cleaning products contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Chemical based cleaners only add further irritants to the air, making it difficult for those with asthma and allergies to breathe. A true cleaning of your home involves natural cleansers without all of the harsh chemicals.

As Bold points out, VOCs are widely found in household products, including paints and varnishes, pesticides, craft materials like glues, adhesives and permanent markers, air fresheners and other synthetic fragrances and cleaning and disinfecting supplies. “A few common VOCs are: Acetone, Benzene, Ethylene glycol, Formaldehyde, Methylene chloride, and Perchloroethylene,” she reveals.

Beware of your appliances.

Sometimes, a “dirty” home isn’t visibly dirty at all. The elements contained within it may be polluting the air without anyone even knowing about it. As Bold highlights, homes may contain combustion pollutants such as “gases or particles that come from burning materials, including space heaters, woodstoves, gas stoves, water heaters, dryers, and fireplaces that are either improperly vented or not vented at all.”

As we always point out, your home’s indoor air quality is extremely important to your overall health. And the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team would like to ensure that you’re breathing the best air possible! For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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The Importance Of Improving The Air Quality Of Our Homes

Yesterday was World Environment Day. Started 44 years ago by the United Nations, WED encourages awareness and action for the protection of our environment. The campaign addresses such environmental issues as marine pollution, human overpopulation, global warming, sustainable consumption and wildlife crime. World Environment Day is recognized with a new theme by over 143 countries each year.

However, it’s important to note that when we think about protecting our environment, it’s not just the great outdoors that we should be concerned with. Most of us spend the majority of our time indoors. So it stands to reason that protecting the environments within which we live is of paramount importance.

“The term ‘air pollution’ usually brings to mind the images of vehicles and factories with fumes and gases,” writes Vinay Pathak for The Economic Times, “But often, people don’t think of their own homes and offices. But according to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, indoor air can be two to five times worse than outside air. Since we spend nearly 90% of our times indoors, improving the air quality at home and work is very important.”

What are the best ways to go about improving the air quality of our homes?

Pathak first addresses some of the obvious measures such as eliminating cigarette smoking in the home. He also strongly suggests the avoidance of products that contain volatile organic compounds. What many people don’t realize is that many of their cleaning products – the same products they believe are improving their home environments – contain VOC’s and are, therefore, hazardous to our health.

“Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are gases emitted from certain solids or liquids,” Pathak explains, “They can have both short and long-term adverse health effects. Some of the most commonly found VOCs at home include paints, solvents, aerosol sprays, cleansers, disinfectants, hobby supplies, pesticides, etc. In offices, common VOCs include building materials, furnishings, copiers, printers and even correction fluids.”

What are some unconventional ways to improve indoor air quality?

Most people are fully aware that smoking is deadly and that chemical-rich products only worsen air quality. However, there are some methods of improving the air in our homes that you may never have thought about. Salt lamps, for example, have been picking up in popularity, as of late. As Jessica Miley of Interesting Engineering explains, salt lamps can help asthmatics to breathe easier.

“If burning candles in your home isn’t your thing, you can achieve the same effect by having a salt lamp,” she reveals, “These lamps, which are created by putting a light source into a large mass of Himalayan salt, emit negative ions when lit. These negative ions will help fight against the positively charged particles and contaminants that cause allergies.”

We care about your air!

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we take the issue of indoor air quality very seriously. Especially if you suffer from asthma and allergies, we’d recommend a professional inspection of the air in your home. For more information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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How To Ward Off Asthma Triggers This Summer

We are about to embark on a very special time in Canada. The summer is almost here! We are just over one month away from the official start of summer. It’s a time of year that most Canadians look very much forward to. And can you blame us? We spend upwards of half of every year enduring cold temperatures. Most of us can’t wait for a long stretch of warm and sunny days.

Asthmatics, on the other hand, may disagree. Even those who much prefer the summer over the winter know that the warmest season of the month can exacerbate asthma symptoms. This is especially true when there is high humidity. Sufferers of asthma need to be on high alert during the summer months to ensure that they keep their asthma triggers at bay.

Keep away from barbeques.

The smells of a barbeque are among the most joyous experiences of the time period between June and September. Most people enjoy a good barbeque. And that includes people with asthma. Our suggestion is not for asthmatics to avoid the events themselves, but to stay clear away from the actual barbeques at those events. Smoke is one of the worst irritants of asthma symptoms.

“Smoke from fires such as barbecues, bonfires or fire pits can also trigger asthma,” warns the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, “If you are hosting the party, consider cooking indoors. If you are attending someone else’s party, try to stay out of the path of smoke.”

Locate areas where you can cool off.

Where there is heat, there is often humidity. On especially hot and muggy days, it’s important for asthmatics to find locations where they can cool off. Sometimes, this can be as simple as finding a spot in the shade. But, oftentimes, it requires an indoor space that is air conditioned. As Madeline R. Vann explains on EverydayHealth.com, inhaling hot air can create problems for asthma sufferers.

“If you have asthma, try not put yourself in situations where you would have to inhale very hot air,” she advises, “This may be tough if you have a job that requires you to be outside in the heat, but consider asking for another task assignment if it’s possible to spend the hottest days or the hottest parts of the day in an air-conditioned space.”

Do away with the perfumes.

Who doesn’t like to smell nice? Perfumes and colognes are the norms for people who are dressing up for special occasions. Many people spray them on every day. However, for those with asthma, these scented products are the equivalent of air pollution. This summer, you’re likely to be invited to many a party. You may want to pass on the fragrances when getting ready for them.

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America warns that products such as scented candles, oil in tiki torches, air fresheners and the perfumes and colognes worn by other party-goers can all trigger asthma symptoms. “If scents trigger your asthma, you may need to send a polite request to the host in advance of the party to ask that they not use these types of products,” they suggest on their site, “It’s not a fun celebration for anyone if a guest experiences breathing distress during a party.”

If you’re an asthma sufferer, it’s also wise to get a professional inspection of the air in your home. For more information about the Air Quality Services provided by DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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Are You A Cigarette Smoker Looking For Ways To Quit?

By today’s standards, the warning “smoking is bad for you” is a mundane statement of the obvious. However, it’s as important as it ever was to stress the importance of eliminating all cigarette smoking from your life. By that we mean that even if you aren’t a smoker yourself, you should take all measures to avoid cigarette smoke at all costs. Simply put, it’s deadly. And it should have no place in your home – ever!

Secondhand smoke is as hazardous to the health of a non-smoker as firsthand smoke is to a smoker. As Statistics Canada explains, secondhand smoke is a combination of smoke exhaled by smokers and the smoke that is released into the air from burning cigarettes, pipes and cigars. Exposure to such smoke can result in a long list of fatal diseases. Among them are lung cancer, heart disease, asthma, bronchitis, middle-ear infections and pneumonia.

If you’re still a cigarette smoker looking for ways to quit, don’t worry – help is certainly available to you.

Nicotine replacement therapy is an option.

Understandably, quitting smoking is easier said than done. It is an addiction. And beating an addiction takes a lot of hard work and dedication. There are, however, some scientifically-proven ways to help smokers quit their nasty habits. Among them is nicotine replacement therapy. As explained by Joe Brownstein on LiveScience.com, this can come in the form of a nicotine patch or nicotine gum.

Glen Morgan is the program director in the Behavioral Research Program at the Tobacco Control Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute. He contributes to Brownstein’s article by noting that some people may not like the taste of the gum and instead, consider the patch more convenient. Others don’t like the continuous delivery of the patch and instead, prefer chewing the gum. Some, however, combine the two to combat intense urges.

Will power is essential.

No matter what scientific methods of assistance you may employ, it’s important to be dedicated to your mission to quit smoking. In some cases, that entails significantly limiting your access to cigarettes. Do you tend to buy cartons? If so, start buying cigarettes in smaller quantities. This will hopefully help you to use them a lot less. At least, this is what is believed by Debra L. Gordon and Dr. David L. Katz.

On the Reader’s Digest website, they suggest that you change your cigarette buying habits. “As you’re getting ready to quit, stop buying cartons of cigarettes,” Gordon and Katz advise, “Instead, only buy a pack at a time, and only carry two or three with you at a time (try putting them in an Altoids tin). Eventually you’ll find that when you want a smoke, you won’t have any immediately available. That will slowly wean you down to fewer cigarettes.”

Cigarette smoke in the home makes for a very hazardous living environment.

Even if no one smokes inside its four walls, the remnants of cigarette smoke on the clothes, skin and hair of the smokers in your household can create some ill health effects. Perhaps, it’s time for a home inspection. For more information about the Air Quality Services offered by DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

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