DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd.
Indoor Air Quality and Environmental Experts

855-668-3131
questions@dftechnical.ca
"

Asthma

How Being Clean And Tidy Is Good For Your Health

Some people classify themselves as “neat freaks”. It’s important to them that they have all of their personal possessions kept in neat, organized fashions, their homes are constantly dusted and vacuumed and that their kitchens and bathrooms are kept immaculate. There’s a lot that goes into being a neat freak. Those of us who really have it bad can’t stand the sight of a speck of dust!

However, an argument can be made that those of us who “have it bad” actually have it pretty good. Keeping a neat and tidy home isn’t just pleasant on the eyes, but it’s good for your health as well. It probably goes without saying that the more dust and dirt you eliminate from your home, the lesser your chances are of contracting some sort of bacterial infection. But the benefits of cleanliness extend beyond well that.

A dirty home is likely to trigger asthma symptoms.

Dust, mould and pet dander – these are common household irritants for those who have asthma and allergies. Anyone with respiratory issues knows just how dangerous these seemingly harmless examples of a dirty home can be. On ApartmentTherapy.com, Cambria Bold explains that asthma and allergy triggers are one of three categories of indoor pollutants that have the potential to cause serious health problems.

“Common household triggers include mould, dust mites, pollen, secondhand smoke, and pet dander,” she writes, “At any given time a home may have mould growing on a shower curtain, dust mites in soft textiles like pillows, blankets or stuffed animals, and cat and dog hair on the floor and upholstery.”

Don’t make your home dirtier by cleaning it.

How exactly can you make a home dirtier by cleaning it? Well, it all depends on what you’re using to clean. Many household cleaning products contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Chemical based cleaners only add further irritants to the air, making it difficult for those with asthma and allergies to breathe. A true cleaning of your home involves natural cleansers without all of the harsh chemicals.

As Bold points out, VOCs are widely found in household products, including paints and varnishes, pesticides, craft materials like glues, adhesives and permanent markers, air fresheners and other synthetic fragrances and cleaning and disinfecting supplies. “A few common VOCs are: Acetone, Benzene, Ethylene glycol, Formaldehyde, Methylene chloride, and Perchloroethylene,” she reveals.

Beware of your appliances.

Sometimes, a “dirty” home isn’t visibly dirty at all. The elements contained within it may be polluting the air without anyone even knowing about it. As Bold highlights, homes may contain combustion pollutants such as “gases or particles that come from burning materials, including space heaters, woodstoves, gas stoves, water heaters, dryers, and fireplaces that are either improperly vented or not vented at all.”

As we always point out, your home’s indoor air quality is extremely important to your overall health. And the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team would like to ensure that you’re breathing the best air possible! For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

*

The Importance Of Improving The Air Quality Of Our Homes

Yesterday was World Environment Day. Started 44 years ago by the United Nations, WED encourages awareness and action for the protection of our environment. The campaign addresses such environmental issues as marine pollution, human overpopulation, global warming, sustainable consumption and wildlife crime. World Environment Day is recognized with a new theme by over 143 countries each year.

However, it’s important to note that when we think about protecting our environment, it’s not just the great outdoors that we should be concerned with. Most of us spend the majority of our time indoors. So it stands to reason that protecting the environments within which we live is of paramount importance.

“The term ‘air pollution’ usually brings to mind the images of vehicles and factories with fumes and gases,” writes Vinay Pathak for The Economic Times, “But often, people don’t think of their own homes and offices. But according to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, indoor air can be two to five times worse than outside air. Since we spend nearly 90% of our times indoors, improving the air quality at home and work is very important.”

What are the best ways to go about improving the air quality of our homes?

Pathak first addresses some of the obvious measures such as eliminating cigarette smoking in the home. He also strongly suggests the avoidance of products that contain volatile organic compounds. What many people don’t realize is that many of their cleaning products – the same products they believe are improving their home environments – contain VOC’s and are, therefore, hazardous to our health.

“Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are gases emitted from certain solids or liquids,” Pathak explains, “They can have both short and long-term adverse health effects. Some of the most commonly found VOCs at home include paints, solvents, aerosol sprays, cleansers, disinfectants, hobby supplies, pesticides, etc. In offices, common VOCs include building materials, furnishings, copiers, printers and even correction fluids.”

What are some unconventional ways to improve indoor air quality?

Most people are fully aware that smoking is deadly and that chemical-rich products only worsen air quality. However, there are some methods of improving the air in our homes that you may never have thought about. Salt lamps, for example, have been picking up in popularity, as of late. As Jessica Miley of Interesting Engineering explains, salt lamps can help asthmatics to breathe easier.

“If burning candles in your home isn’t your thing, you can achieve the same effect by having a salt lamp,” she reveals, “These lamps, which are created by putting a light source into a large mass of Himalayan salt, emit negative ions when lit. These negative ions will help fight against the positively charged particles and contaminants that cause allergies.”

We care about your air!

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we take the issue of indoor air quality very seriously. Especially if you suffer from asthma and allergies, we’d recommend a professional inspection of the air in your home. For more information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

How To Ward Off Asthma Triggers This Summer

We are about to embark on a very special time in Canada. The summer is almost here! We are just over one month away from the official start of summer. It’s a time of year that most Canadians look very much forward to. And can you blame us? We spend upwards of half of every year enduring cold temperatures. Most of us can’t wait for a long stretch of warm and sunny days.

Asthmatics, on the other hand, may disagree. Even those who much prefer the summer over the winter know that the warmest season of the month can exacerbate asthma symptoms. This is especially true when there is high humidity. Sufferers of asthma need to be on high alert during the summer months to ensure that they keep their asthma triggers at bay.

Keep away from barbeques.

The smells of a barbeque are among the most joyous experiences of the time period between June and September. Most people enjoy a good barbeque. And that includes people with asthma. Our suggestion is not for asthmatics to avoid the events themselves, but to stay clear away from the actual barbeques at those events. Smoke is one of the worst irritants of asthma symptoms.

“Smoke from fires such as barbecues, bonfires or fire pits can also trigger asthma,” warns the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, “If you are hosting the party, consider cooking indoors. If you are attending someone else’s party, try to stay out of the path of smoke.”

Locate areas where you can cool off.

Where there is heat, there is often humidity. On especially hot and muggy days, it’s important for asthmatics to find locations where they can cool off. Sometimes, this can be as simple as finding a spot in the shade. But, oftentimes, it requires an indoor space that is air conditioned. As Madeline R. Vann explains on EverydayHealth.com, inhaling hot air can create problems for asthma sufferers.

“If you have asthma, try not put yourself in situations where you would have to inhale very hot air,” she advises, “This may be tough if you have a job that requires you to be outside in the heat, but consider asking for another task assignment if it’s possible to spend the hottest days or the hottest parts of the day in an air-conditioned space.”

Do away with the perfumes.

Who doesn’t like to smell nice? Perfumes and colognes are the norms for people who are dressing up for special occasions. Many people spray them on every day. However, for those with asthma, these scented products are the equivalent of air pollution. This summer, you’re likely to be invited to many a party. You may want to pass on the fragrances when getting ready for them.

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America warns that products such as scented candles, oil in tiki torches, air fresheners and the perfumes and colognes worn by other party-goers can all trigger asthma symptoms. “If scents trigger your asthma, you may need to send a polite request to the host in advance of the party to ask that they not use these types of products,” they suggest on their site, “It’s not a fun celebration for anyone if a guest experiences breathing distress during a party.”

If you’re an asthma sufferer, it’s also wise to get a professional inspection of the air in your home. For more information about the Air Quality Services provided by DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

Are You A Cigarette Smoker Looking For Ways To Quit?

By today’s standards, the warning “smoking is bad for you” is a mundane statement of the obvious. However, it’s as important as it ever was to stress the importance of eliminating all cigarette smoking from your life. By that we mean that even if you aren’t a smoker yourself, you should take all measures to avoid cigarette smoke at all costs. Simply put, it’s deadly. And it should have no place in your home – ever!

Secondhand smoke is as hazardous to the health of a non-smoker as firsthand smoke is to a smoker. As Statistics Canada explains, secondhand smoke is a combination of smoke exhaled by smokers and the smoke that is released into the air from burning cigarettes, pipes and cigars. Exposure to such smoke can result in a long list of fatal diseases. Among them are lung cancer, heart disease, asthma, bronchitis, middle-ear infections and pneumonia.

If you’re still a cigarette smoker looking for ways to quit, don’t worry – help is certainly available to you.

Nicotine replacement therapy is an option.

Understandably, quitting smoking is easier said than done. It is an addiction. And beating an addiction takes a lot of hard work and dedication. There are, however, some scientifically-proven ways to help smokers quit their nasty habits. Among them is nicotine replacement therapy. As explained by Joe Brownstein on LiveScience.com, this can come in the form of a nicotine patch or nicotine gum.

Glen Morgan is the program director in the Behavioral Research Program at the Tobacco Control Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute. He contributes to Brownstein’s article by noting that some people may not like the taste of the gum and instead, consider the patch more convenient. Others don’t like the continuous delivery of the patch and instead, prefer chewing the gum. Some, however, combine the two to combat intense urges.

Will power is essential.

No matter what scientific methods of assistance you may employ, it’s important to be dedicated to your mission to quit smoking. In some cases, that entails significantly limiting your access to cigarettes. Do you tend to buy cartons? If so, start buying cigarettes in smaller quantities. This will hopefully help you to use them a lot less. At least, this is what is believed by Debra L. Gordon and Dr. David L. Katz.

On the Reader’s Digest website, they suggest that you change your cigarette buying habits. “As you’re getting ready to quit, stop buying cartons of cigarettes,” Gordon and Katz advise, “Instead, only buy a pack at a time, and only carry two or three with you at a time (try putting them in an Altoids tin). Eventually you’ll find that when you want a smoke, you won’t have any immediately available. That will slowly wean you down to fewer cigarettes.”

Cigarette smoke in the home makes for a very hazardous living environment.

Even if no one smokes inside its four walls, the remnants of cigarette smoke on the clothes, skin and hair of the smokers in your household can create some ill health effects. Perhaps, it’s time for a home inspection. For more information about the Air Quality Services offered by DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

3 Ways To Minimize All Of That Pesky Dust In Your Home

Dust is in all of our homes. No matter how often we clean, it always seems to return. Dust is primarily made up of our skin flakes and microscopic fibres, so there’s no real way to eliminate it from our homes for good. However, proper upkeep is integral removing dust and improving indoor air quality in order to live in a healthy environment. This is especially true for allergy and asthma sufferers.

So how can you minimize all of that pesky dust in your home? Here are three ideas:

1. Replace your bedding on a weekly basis.

You may not assume that your bed is among the dustiest areas of your home…but it is. What you may not realize is that while you’re dozing each and every night, your skin flakes. In addition to the fibres that your bedding regularly sheds, your nightly place of rest actually becomes a haven for dust – and therefore, dust mites. These microscopic creatures eat your skin flakes and leave behind microscopic droppings that only add to the list of asthma irritants already in your home.

Your best bet? Change and wash your sheets every single week. “To minimize the fallout (of dust), wash sheets and pillowcases weekly,” advises Gary Wentz of Reader’s Digest, “Items that aren’t machine washable don’t need weekly trips to the dry cleaners—just take blankets and bedspreads outside and shake them. You can smack some of the dust out of pillows, but for a thorough cleaning, wash or dry-clean them.”

2. Take your carpets outside for a beating.

Branching off of that last point, Wentz also suggests that you take things a step further with your carpeting. Firstly, the less carpet you have in your home the better. Naturally, dust gets trapped in carpet and no matter how much you vacuum, it’s hard to remove it completely. As a result, Wentz advises that you take your removable carpets and rugs outside and give them some good beatings!

“Drape them over a fence or clothesline and beat them with a broom or tennis racket,” he recommends, “Give your cushions the same treatment. Upholstery fabric not only sheds its own fibers but also absorbs dust that settles on it, so you raise puffs of dust every time you sit down. Beat cushions in the backyard or use slipcovers and give them a good shake. If you want to eliminate upholstery dust, buy leather- or vinyl-covered furniture.”

3. Use microfiber products for dusting.

Do away with dusters. Those feathery little trinkets only spread the dust around. A standard rag also won’t do the trick, even when using them with store-bought furniture polish. As FamilyHandyman.com, explains, “microfiber products attract and hold dust with an electrostatic charge, unlike dry rags and feather dusters, which just spread dust around. Machine washable microfiber products can save you money over disposable brands because you can use them over and over.”

As you can imagine, there are many other ways to minimize dust accumulation in your home. However, at DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we highly recommend having the indoor air quality of your home tested. For more information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

2 Important Cleaning Tips For Asthmatics

Some asthmatics have likened their respiratory conditions to having someone trapped in their chests, gripping their lungs and closing off their airways. Simply put, asthma makes it hard to breathe. Therefore, it’s wise for all asthmatics to take important precautions when it comes to keeping their airways free of irritants.

For many asthmatics, smoke is a major trigger for symptoms. Some have described the presence of smoke in their vicinities as “poison” that has a “severe choking effect”. Naturally, asthmatics generally stay clear away from smoke as well as other irritants such as dust, pollen and pet dander. And this makes many an asthmatic a neat freak.

But did you know that the very act of cleaning the home can present problems for asthmatics? Here are two important cleaning tips that will help:

1. Do away with harsh cleaning products.

Most of us are pretty used to opening up scented bottles of cleaning products so that our homes smell clean and fresh once we’ve completely our housecleaning chores. Those smells, however, are actually signs that there are harmful chemicals lingering in the air. Volatile organic compounds do favours for no one’s respiratory system. Asthmatics should stay away from them. On AllergicLiving.com, Jennifer Van Evra refers to such products as “chemical soups”.

“With their cheerful advertisements and colorful bottles, it’s easy to forget that many household cleaners are chemical soups that may set off respiratory and skin reactions in people who are sensitive,” she writes, “But not only are they triggers, Massachusetts research scientist Anila Bello says they can actually cause new sensitivities to form.”

Evra goes on to point out that Bello has even helped Boston-area hospitals to use safer cleaning products after their nurses complained of respiratory issues after entering rooms that had just been cleaned.

2. Make cleaning up after your pet a non-existent chore.

Sometimes the best way to clean is not to have to clean at all. And, in the case of pet dander, that’s especially true. It can be hard for an asthma sufferer who is also an animal lover. But the fact that dog and cat fur can trigger breathing trouble makes it so that being a pet owner isn’t always a good idea. On EverydayHealth.com, Elizabeth Shimer Bowers suggests that asthmatics think twice before bringing a dog or cat home.

“Pet dander is one of the most problematic triggers when it comes to allergic asthma symptoms,” she informs, “it’s the proteins in a pet’s dander, saliva, and urine that aggravate asthma symptoms.”

She goes on to quote Ohio-based allergist, Dr. Princess Ogbogu, who notes that “When people with asthma inhale (pet dander) particles, this can really set off an asthma attack… If you do choose to have a pet…limit your exposure to the animal by keeping it out of your bedroom.”

Of course, there are many other cleaning tips that asthmatics should consider. De-cluttering the home to minimize dust accumulation and keeping smokers out of the home are just two more. However, at DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we highly recommend having the indoor air quality of your home tested.

For more information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

The Importance Of Vacuuming To Promote Optimum Health

There is a growing trend emerging in homes all across Canada. And that is to rip up carpets and have them replaced with hardwood floors. The commonplace thinking behind this trend is that hardwood floors provide more desirable and even sophisticated appearances to living spaces. Further to that, homeowners feel that hardwood floors increase the value of their homes.

And there are those who believe that hardwood floors are easier to keep clean than carpets. This is especially true in the event of spills. These people wouldn’t be wrong. In fact, the concept of cleanliness is one that speaks to a larger issue: the health of Canadians nationwide. It can be stated with confidence that the less carpet you have in your home, the more likely you will be to avoid numerous health concerns. Sufferers of asthma and other allergies know this all too well. Simply put, carpet is a breeding ground for allergens and other allergy-triggering irritants.

“When you vacuum, you’re not simply cleaning your house or apartment for appearance’s sake, you’re also safeguarding the health of yourself and your family,” insists Jason Roberts on VacuumsGuide.com, “There are dozens of tiny microbes constantly floating around, which can cause a lot of problems for people with asthma and inhalant-related allergies such as hay fever. Dust mites, bacteria, and mould attack an asthma sufferer’s respiratory system, making them wheeze, have difficulty breathing, and cough violently at night.”

Roberts also provides an infographic that offers up ten different reasons why we should all be vacuuming our homes at least once a week. Topping the list is the fact that we all shed millions of skin cells by the hour. They accumulate in our carpets and rugs, creating environments that are rife with dangerous microorganisms.

Because of this, experts often recommend taking vacuuming practices a step further. On FullHouseCS.ca, A.J. Pipkin discusses the importance of installing a quality HEPA filter in your vacuum cleaner. “Dirt, hair and dust particles can trigger the onset of allergy symptoms if there is a large amount of dust mites in your home carpets or in the air,” he points out, “Not vacuum cleaning regularly will cause those in your home to be unprotected from allergies and asthma symptoms.”

Regular vacuuming is an even more essential requirement for smokers. It’s important to note that the reality of “thirdhand smoke” can impact the health of non-smokers who enter environments where a smoker had previously lit up. Roberts’ infographic reveals that carcinogens and other substances from cigarettes can “impregnate” carpets, rugs and upholstery. This has the ability to increase the risk of cancer in both children and pets.

And, by the way, it’s time to do away with the so-called “five second rule” that many people practice towards dropped food. When people drop food on the floor, it should be recognized as immediately contaminated. The infographic explains that our floors carry Salmonella, E-coli and other viruses that have the potential to wreak havoc on our digestive systems. This provides all the more reason to regularly vacuum our floors, regardless if they are carpeted or not.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we know the importance of keeping a clean home. Our Air Quality Services focus on problem areas that may be presenting health hazards to your family and other visitors to the home. For more information on how we can help you to live in a healthier environment, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

Winning The Battle Against Dust Mites With Regular Bed Sheet Washing

How often do you think you should wash your bed sheets?

Some people wash their bed sheets once a week. Some decide to throw them in the washer every other week. And some even think that once a month will suffice. At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we highly recommend the weekly routine. As Marisa Ramiccio puts it on SymptomFind.com, “if you’re washing your sheets only once a month, that’s not going to cut it. Your sheets need to be washed at least every other week, but weekly is ideal.”

Why is it so important to wash your bed sheets at least once a week?

Let’s consider how often you sleep and what you leave behind when you sleep. On average, you’re in your bed approximately eight hours each night – that is, of course, if you’re getting the recommended amount of sleep for optimum health. Let’s suppose that you’re in your clothes for approximately the same amount of time each day. Usually, you’ll put them in the wash after one wear, right?

When you sleep, you leave behind hair, oil, sweat, bodily fluids and even food crumbs (for those in-the-bed snackers). We also leave behind a bunch of dead skin cells. And, as far as dust mites are concerned, this means you’ve left behind a scrumptious buffet meal! Your body sheds about a million skin cells a day. So, as you can imagine, this attracts a lot of dust mites who practically live in your bed.

What are dust mites?

Dust mites are microscopic bugs that aren’t visible to the naked eye. As Ramiccio explains, “these little things live, die and reproduce in the same bed sheets that you sleep in. The only way to keep these creatures under control is to wash your bed sheets on a regular basis. Otherwise, you may develop an allergy, or even a lowered immune system.”

On AllergicLiving.com, Dory Cerny goes into greater detail about these “cousins to the spider”. She explains that “they spend their two to four months of life eating, creating waste and reproducing. A female will lay 100 eggs in her lifetime, and each mite produces about 10 to 20 waste pellets a day…Mites eat minuscule flakes of human skin and animal dander. They can’t drink, but absorb moisture from the atmosphere.”

So how do dust mites impact our health?

The waste produced by dust mites is a known allergen that triggers asthma attacks. Because dust mites thrive on warmth and moisture, your mattress and bed sheets are often sought out as their ideal homes. The skin flakes and other above mentioned things that we all leave in our beds are consumed by dust mites, giving them more opportunities to leave behind allergy-triggering waste products.

“An average mattress contains between 100,000 and 10 million bugs,” informs Cerny, “A study in 2000 found that more than 45 per cent of American homes had detectable dust mite levels associated with the development of allergies, and 23 per cent had bedding with concentrations of allergen high enough to trigger asthma attacks.” This is why regular bed sheet washing is so important. Washing your sheets in hot water on a weekly basis is the best way to win the battle against dust mites.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we strongly promote the need for Canadians to live in healthy homes. This is why we’re so proud to offer Air Quality Services that work to eliminate health hazards from the air we breathe. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

3 Harmful Substances In Our Household Cleaning Products

Who doesn’t like a clean and tidy, fresh-smelling home? Most of us, we’d think, relish the idea of walking into our homes with everything in their proper places, having no dust to look at and enjoying the smell of a fresh summer day. Oh, those pleasant smells! Too often, they have us thinking our homes are clean and safe to inhabit. And that’s why cleaning product manufacturers go to great lengths to add fragrances to cleaning products.

But are scented cleaning products good for our health? Overwhelming evidence insists that they are not. And that’s because they contain an array of harmful substances.

What are those substances and how do they impact our health? Here are three to watch out for:

1. Phthalates. These are commonly found in many of our fragrance-enriched cleaning products such as dish soap, air fresheners and even toilet paper. As Jessie Sholl explains on ExperienceLife.com, the word “phthalates” doesn’t appear on product labels due to proprietary laws. Therefore, it’s important to look out for the word “fragrance” instead. It’s a sign that phthalates are present.

“Phthalates are known endocrine disruptors,” explains Sholl, “Although exposure to phthalates mainly occurs through inhalation, it can also happen through skin contact with scented soaps, which is a significant problem…Unlike the digestive system, the skin has no safeguards against toxins. Absorbed chemicals go straight to organs.” It is highly recommended that you opt for fragrance-free or all-natural organic products to clean your home.

2. Ammonia. Ammonia is a more commonly known cleaning substance, but it’s a powerful irritant. It’s especially hazardous to sufferers of asthma and other respiratory diseases. Nevertheless, the chemical is found in numerous polishing agents for bathroom fixtures, sinks and jewellery. It’s also found in glass, floor and oven cleaners.

According to Dr. Edward Group on GlobalHealingCenter.com, if a product is at least 5 percent ammonia, it must be labelled as poisonous. He notes that studies have confirmed that ammonia can irritate, burn and even damage the eyes and skin. “Ammonia is irritating to the respiratory tract and causes coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath,” he explains, “Higher exposure can cause pulmonary edema, a life-threatening issue.”

3. 2-Butoxyethanol. The sweet smell that emanates from window cleaners is thanks to a chemical known as 2-Butoxyethanol. And just like phthalates, law does not require it to be listed on a product’s label. Sounds crazy, doesn’t it? Especially when you consider that the Environmental Protection Agency has found that 2-Butoxyethanol can cause sore throats, narcosis, pulmonary edema and severe liver and kidney damage, reveals Sholl.

Safer options for cleaning mirrors and windows are diluted vinegar. “For other kitchen tasks, stick to simple cleaning compounds like Bon Ami powder; it’s made from natural ingredients like ground feldspar and baking soda without the added bleach or fragrances found in most commercial cleansers,” Sholl suggests, “You can also make your own formulas with baking soda, vinegar and essential oils.”

As you may have guessed, we’re only scratching the surface here. There is a long list of harmful substances that are found in many of our household cleaning products. Every time we clean our homes with them, we’re doing our health a disservice.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we’re committed to helping our clients enjoy safe air to breathe in their homes. Our Air Quality Services are designed to locate any areas of concern in your home that may be presenting reasons for poor indoor air quality. Allow us to help you eliminate them!

For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

3 Ways To Minimize A Dust Mite Infestation In Your Home

Stop Dust Mite - Red Sign Painted - Open Hand Raised, Isolated on White BackgroundWarning: this is going to sound a bit gross. But when you lay your head down on your pillow to go to bed each night, you’re not exactly alone. Your pillow, in all likelihood, is home to millions of dust mites. And while they are so microscopic they cannot be seen by the naked eye, they remain health hazards for those with asthma and allergies. Now don’t worry – dust mites do not bite, sting or enter our bodies.

Instead, it is their feces and body fragments that present harmful allergens. They love to feed on our dead skin and, as a result, they exist practically everywhere our dead skin may fall. As you may have guessed, they tend to really enjoy our beds considering how often we’re in them and the fact they generally provide warmth. Dust mites thrive on heat and humidity and this is why special attention should be paid to reducing the number that live in your home this summer.

So how can you minimize a dust mite infestation in your home? Here are three ways:

1. Wash your pillows often. Most of us wash our bed linens on a regular basis and naturally, that includes pillow cases. But did you know that you should be washing your pillows as well? Angela Mulholland of CTV News advises us to throw our pillows into the laundry at least two or three times a year in order to remove dust, sweat and saliva stains. If you’re an allergy sufferer, you should wash your pillows more often than that.

“There are lots of guides on washing pillows,” informs Mulholland, “but essentially, a little detergent and Borax to neutralize sweat smells is all you need. Almost all pillows except foam ones can go in the wash. Just be sure they are fully dried to eliminate all leftover moisture. Since foam pellet and solid foam pillows cannot go in the dryer, they should be regularly vacuumed or periodically replaced.”

2. Remove carpets and/or become a “vacuumaholic”. Many Canadians have replaced their carpets for hardware floors to give their homes more aesthetically pleasing looks. But they’ve also done their health a favour by getting rid of these havens for dust mites. If you choose to keep carpet in certain rooms of your home, be sure to vacuum as regularly as you can. Removing dust from your living environment is essential for keeping dust mites at bay.

The Canada Safety Council recommends that you buy a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter. “Ordinary vacuuming will only send dust mites and their particles into the air,” they report, “It’s not clear how much a HEPA filter actually helps with allergies, but it’s worth trying. Ideally, if you’re allergic, get someone else to vacuum and dust. Vacuum bags should be changed often, since mites and debris can get out.”

3. Try vapour steam-cleaning. Not many people have heard about this technique, but it is one that can definitely help with the dust mite issue in your home. You see, not all of your bedding can be thrown in the laundry. Take your mattress, for example. As revealed on Gaiam.com, in her book, Home Enlightenment: Create a Nurturing, Healthy, and Toxin-Free Home, Annie B. Bond suggests vapour steam-cleaning as a dust mite removal option.

“Vapour steam-cleaning (using a small machine that heats surfaces with dry steam) kills fungus, dust mites, bacteria, and other undesirables,” she writes, “This is a good way to clean bedding that you can’t launder, such as mattresses. Vapour contains only 5 to 6 percent water (conversely, most steam cleaners use lots of warm water to clean), so the vapour steam doesn’t contribute to a moist environment. Vapour steam deeply penetrates whatever it is cleaning, and it is great for upholstery, couches, carpets, and mattresses.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we know how important it is for Canadians to live in homes that promote good health. Eliminating health hazards from the air we breathe is the primary objective of our Air Quality Services. For more information, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment