DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd.
Indoor Air Quality and Environmental Experts

855-668-3131
questions@dftechnical.ca
"

Asbestos

So What Exactly Will It Take For Asbestos To Be Banned?

Readers of the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. Blog are well aware of our stance on asbestos. For years, we’ve been utilizing our blog to expose the extreme dangers of the substance and have steadfastly stood behind our federal government’s proposal to ban asbestos this year. Our question, for quite some time and continues to be “What exactly is the hold up?”

With all of the evidence that shows that, without a shadow of a doubt, asbestos is the culprit behind numerous lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis diagnoses, its ban should have come a long time ago. Asbestos is widely known as the leading cause of workplace deaths in Canada. We understand that bans aren’t enacted overnight. But the nearly year and a half that has passed since Prime Minister Justin Trudeau proposed the ban can’t exactly be described as overnight.

At this juncture, it seems as if it’s necessary for other politicians to get in on the action.

Bob Bailey is one such politician. He’s running for MPP in Ontario’s Sarnia-Lambton riding. As reported yesterday by Melanie Irwin on BlackburnNews.com, Bailey is making his stance on the banning of asbestos part of his platform. Evidently, he isn’t pleased that the nationwide ban of the toxic material isn’t yet in place.

“We stopped mining asbestos in 2011, but asbestos imports into Canada and especially in Ontario, have nearly doubled in value between 2011 and 2016 to $8.2-million for the year,” Bailey is quoted as saying in the article. The PC member is lobbying for the Ontario government to create a public registry of all provincially owned or leased buildings that contain asbestos.

Politicians south of the border are also taking a stance.

As reported by nwLaborPress.org last month, “Oregon U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley and U.S. Representative Suzanne Bonamici are sponsoring bills to ban the use of asbestos.” Merkley, who is a Democrat, insists that it’s “outrageous” that asbestos is still allowed to enter the United States in 2018. He is calling for the nation to “catch up” to the rest of the industrialized world to ban the deadly substance.

The article explains the dangers of asbestos in the most clear-cut way possible: “Each year, as many as 15,000 people die from asbestos-related diseases, and 3,000 people are diagnosed with mesothelioma, a deadly form of cancer typically caused by exposure to asbestos. Asbestos-related diseases typically take decades to develop. Mesothelioma, for example, has a latency period of 20 to 50 years.”

Seriously, what is the hold up with the ban?

With such a harrowing and scarily accurate explanation of the dangers of asbestos, the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team can be forgiven for losing its collective patience. We can’t come up with a single reason why there remains a delay for the nationwide ban of asbestos to take effect in Canada. We’re equally surprised that our counterparts in the United States haven’t taken further action to ban asbestos as well.

As always, we will remain committed to assisting Canadians with the removal of asbestos from their homes and places of work. For information about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services, please call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

*

Proposed Asbestos Ban Facing Some Criticism

Since December of 2016, when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that Canada would finally implement a comprehensive nationwide ban of asbestos, the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. Blog has been following the story quite closely. Originally, the plan was to have the toxic substance completely outlawed by 2018. Well, here we are in 2018 and we’re still awaiting word of the official passing of the long-promised ban.

In one of our several blogs covering the topic, we revealed that a “consultation period” was being requested to ask both the public and industry for feedback about the new policy regarding asbestos. This period concluded on March 22nd. Now, nearly three weeks removed from that consultation period, Canadians are left wondering what the holdup is.

What are the issues surrounding the asbestos ban?

According to Muller & Green – an organization that specializes in research, analysis, consulting and PR activity for local and global brands – the new asbestos policy may not be what it’s cracked up to be. In a recent report published by Newswire.ca, Muller & Green revealed that the Canadian government’s proposed ban of asbestos is facing some criticism. Although $114 million has been committed to implement a new policy, there are some holes in the specifics.

As Muller & Green report, there is apparently “no distinction between harmful asbestos such as the various amphibole asbestos and chrysotile, and ‘white asbestos’, still used in various products today. This omission is critical for numerous businesses and industries in Canada, which rely on products containing the non-harmful form of the mineral.”

Because of the lack of distinction between the different forms of asbestos, the proposed ban is likely to force a number of Canadian businesses to shut down. And while the health of Canadians is clearly far more important, the plan is also being criticized for not taking into consideration the work already being done to prevent asbestos-related diseases.

“One of the rationales for the proposal is economic, in terms of savings that will be made in health services from reduced cases of asbestos-related diseases,” reads the report, “However, regulations and prevention of asbestos-related diseases have been established, contradicting the health argument.”

What other concerns have arisen from the new proposal?

By not distinguishing the differences between the various forms of asbestos, there is a concern that billions of dollars will end up being wasted on removing “safe asbestos” from public buildings. The financial figures for the implementation of the plan, says the report, appear to be understated.

As well, the planned proposal for the ban has apparently exempted mining activities and the use of asbestos in the chlor-alkali industry. It has been reported that the use of asbestos in the chlor-alkali industry will remain acceptable until 2025.

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we’re not convinced that there is a reasonable and safe way to continue to use any asbestos in this country. The damage that it has caused has been well documented. We need not another Canadian death that is asbestos-related. The time for the ban to take effect has come. In fact, it is well past due.

Of course, in the meantime, our team remains dedicated to helping Canadians to remove asbestos from their homes and places of work. For information about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services, please call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

24 Sussex Drive Becoming Known As An Asbestos Haven

Last month, our blog reported on the fact that Canada’s Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau is one of the few leaders of our country to avoid living at 24 Sussex Drive. Traditionally known as the home of the sitting Prime Minister, the Ottawa-based mansion appears to be in ruins. Requiring millions of dollars in renovations, the property is now becoming known as a very high health hazard.

There is more asbestos inside 24 Sussex Drive than originally thought.

As Catharine Tunney reports today for CBC News, 24 Sussex Drive has more asbestos contained within it than previously thought. Who can blame Trudeau for ditching the residence for nearby Rideau Cottage? Of course, as the son of Pierre Trudeau, our current Prime Minister spent time living at 24 Sussex Drive as a child. He is unlikely to ever return thanks to the presence of asbestos.

“Asbestos has been condemned by the World Health Organization as a health threat and the once-common fireproofing material is now banned in some 50 countries around the world,” Tunney explains, “Canada was once a leading world supplier of the carcinogenic mineral. It’s linked to mesothelioma, an aggressive cancer that can develop in the lining of the lungs as a result of inhaling asbestos dust and fibres.”

She goes on to reveal that in 2015, an engineering firm called Exp Services Inc. investigated the main building, the pool house and the neighbouring RCMP building at 24 Sussex. They surveyed for hazardous materials including asbestos and lead paint. Previously, they had received reports that the plaster contained within the walls was asbestos-free. However, their investigation discovered that wasn’t the case.

CBC News obtained a report through the Access to Information Act that revealed that the grey coarse plaster within the property was indeed asbestos-containing. The report notes that should the plaster go undisturbed, 24 Sussex would be safe for its inhabitants. Any renovations, however, would send asbestos fibres airborne. And, as we pointed out last month, the property is in serious need of renovations.

The asbestos-containing plaster at 24 Sussex can be easily disturbed.

Laura Lozanski is an occupational health and safety officer with the Canadian Association of University Teachers and one of Canada’s most active asbestos educators. In Tunney’s article, she reveals that just rubbing up against the plaster or drilling into it will release toxic asbestos fibres. “Once the fibres are disturbed they go into the air and that’s how we either breathe them in or ingest them,” she is quoted as saying, “So we always have quite serious concerns.”

Since 2011, no asbestos has been removed from 24 Sussex Drive. Of course, should there be any renovations made to the property, construction workers will be placed at risk. Staffers who have already been inside the mansion may already be at risk. “That’s why the Public Service Alliance of Canada has been pushing the federal government to create a national registry of public buildings that contain asbestos,” Tunney writes.

As you’re very likely aware, the team at DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. takes the matter of asbestos exposure very seriously. As we patiently await the nation’s official implementation of the comprehensive asbestos ban, we continue to work with Canadian home and business owners to keep their properties as safe as possible.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services. Give us a call at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

Australia Still Battling Effects Of Asbestos 15 Years After Ban

Back in December of 2016, the Government of Canada finally announced its plan to implement a nationwide ban of asbestos, set to take effect this year. As we’ve been highlighting in numerous blogs since then, the comprehensive ban of the toxic material can’t come soon enough. Among the many deadly diseases caused by asbestos exposure is mesothelioma. And sadly, it’s something that is bound to continue to threaten the lives of Canadians long after the ban is in place.

This is evidenced by the fact that Australia continues to be haunted by health hazards that have been brought on by its legacy of asbestos mining. As reported by Alex Strauss on SurvivingMesothelioma.com, the ‘land from down under’ banned all forms of asbestos nearly fifteen years ago. However, a new report reveals that mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases continue to affect the lives of Australians.

Mesothelioma affects thousands of Australians.

The report, authored by researchers at the Asbestos Diseases Research Institute and published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, explains that while mesothelioma cases have levelled off over the past decade, more than 16,000 Australians were diagnosed with the disease between 1982 and 2016.

Strauss notes that the country’s status as the top user of asbestos in the world between the 1960s and 1970s has a lot to do with its high rates of pleural mesothelioma, peritoneal mesothelioma, asbestosis and lung cancer. Evidently, Australia took too long to ban asbestos even though there were growing concerns about the toxic mineral all those decades ago. Asbestos was not officially banned in Australia until 2003.

Dr. Matthew Soeberg of the University of Sydney is the first author of the new report. He believes that Australia is headed in the right direction but, along with his colleagues, believes that a greater focus must be placed on “preventing the devastating effects of avoidable asbestos-related diseases.”

Who is still most at risk of asbestos exposure?

Individuals who attempt to take on home renovation projects on their own are putting themselves in danger. If their buildings contain asbestos, they are at a high risk of developing asbestos-related diseases. This is true in both Australia and the United States.

“In the US, virtually every home and public building constructed before 1980 is presumed to contain some amount of asbestos,” writes Strauss, “To minimize the risk for pleural mesothelioma, homeowners are urged to seek professional guidance before starting a remodelling project that could disturb asbestos.

He goes on to point out that Australia is one of 55 countries that have official asbestos bans in place. Both the United States and Canada are excluded from that list. Of course, we continue to wait, somewhat impatiently, for Canada’s asbestos ban to officially take effect. But even when the ban is in place, measures will still need to be taken in order to limit asbestos exposure and significantly diminish the number of future asbestos-related disease diagnoses.

Australia has proven that we still have a long road ahead of us.

But, at DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we are certainly willing to do our part! For information about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services, please call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

Asbestos A Factor In Keeping The Prime Minister Out Of 24 Sussex Drive

The White House in Washington, D.C. is world famous for being the residence of the sitting President of the United States. Known to a lesser degree, but widely recognized throughout Canada, is 24 Sussex Drive – the Ottawa, Ontario residence of Canada’s Prime Minister. That is, of course, until now. Reports have described the 19th century structure as one that is practically uninhabitable.

24 Sussex Drive is “deteriorating, mouse-infested (and) hydro-draining”.

As Catharine Tunney of CBC reports, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who was raised at 24 Sussex Drive during his father Pierre’s tenure as Prime Minister in the early 1980s, isn’t likely to return to the “deteriorating, mouse-infested, hydro-draining and oft-spoofed official residence of Canada’s head of government”.

Originally named Gorffwysfa, which is Welsh for “place of peace”, the stone mansion which sits at 24 Sussex Drive is in desperate need of renovations. However, the Prime Minister is of the mind that taxpayer money shouldn’t go to the upkeep of the home of its nation’s leader.

“There’s a real challenge in this country,” Trudeau is quoted as saying in Tunney’s article, “Anything that a prime minister decides that they can potentially benefit from — that’s one of the reasons that that house has gone into the ground since the time I lived there — is that no prime minister wants to spend a penny of taxpayer dollars on upkeeping that house.” The Trudeau family lives in a nearby Rideau Cottage instead of the traditional home of the Prime Minister.

24 Sussex Drive is in need of “urgent” repairs.

Tunney notes that an auditor’s report from ten years ago reported that a repair bill would run upwards of $10 million. The 35-room residence, in fact, hasn’t had any major renovations since 1951. “It also found the windows, plumbing, electrical systems, heating and air conditioning in poor to critical condition, and noted the home had no fire sprinklers and contained asbestos,” she reports.

As if this description of the Canadian Prime Minister’s intended home isn’t bad enough, the presence of asbestos in the mansion is yet another reason it has become so undesirable. In fact, there have been calls by former residences of 24 Sussex Drive for it to be torn down and replaced with a structure befitting the leader of a nation.

One such former resident is Maureen McTeer. The wife of former Prime Minister Joe Clark feels that the building isn’t worth saving, especially considering that its 1951 renovations stripped it of all of its original fixtures. In a separate CBC report by John Paul Tasker, McTeer also points out that the presence of asbestos at 24 Sussex Drive simply makes the residence unlivable.

24 Sussex Drive is “an old, crumbling building with asbestos”.

“This residence is much more than just a house — or even a place where prime ministers live while they’re in office — it should represent an idea of Canada,” she is quoted as saying in an interview with Rita Celli on CBC Radio’s Ontario Today, “That’s why an old, crumbling building with asbestos, which we know is poison, really is so lacking of vision, if you will, and [does not reflect] who we are as Canadians.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we are definitely of the mind that our nation’s leader deserves a better home. However, we also believe that all Canadians deserve to live in asbestos-free residences. For information about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services, please call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

Canada Apparently Has To Wait Another Year For Asbestos Ban

A couple of weeks ago, we blogged about the new rules and regulations regarding asbestos in Canada. Of course, that blog entry was one in a long line of articles covering the proposed comprehensive ban set forth by the federal government back in December of 2016. For all intents and purposes, we have been made to believe that the ban would officially be launched this year.

For the past year, new reports have claimed that asbestos will be banned in Canada in 2018.

However, a report released by TireBusiness.com earlier this week, reveals that we will all have to wait until next year to celebrate the asbestos ban. Perhaps, we missed something. To be sure, we checked back and re-read The Canadian Press article published by CanadianBusiness.com cited in our blog from two weeks ago. The article informs us that the government is accepting feedback on its proposed changes between now and March 22nd. No word of the ban not coming into full effect until 2019.

The recent report, compiled by The Canadian Press and Rob Bostelaar of Automotive News Canada, provides much of the same information as the report from earlier this month. It, too, notes that “the government is asking the public and industry for feedback during a comment period, which ends March 22.”

Were we missing something the last time around?

We searched the internet for other news sources, attempting to confirm a date for the nationwide asbestos ban. There is no other article claiming it will take another entire year. You can rest assure that we will remain on top of this issue. Perhaps, a call to the federal government is in order. Needless to say, at this point, asbestos is deadly. Delaying its ban any further is nonsensical.

As TireBusiness.com explains, “asbestos is a carcinogen that has been condemned by the World Health Organization and is banned in about 50 countries around the world…Asbestos was mined in Canada until 2011 and was used mainly for insulating buildings and homes, as well as for fireproofing. Many uses have been phased out, but asbestos still may be found in a variety of products, including cement pipes, industrial furnaces and heating systems, building insulation, automotive brake pads and clutches.”

Brake pads remain among the top sources of asbestos exposure in Canada.

The nation continues to import asbestos-laden brake pads to the tune of 333,000 units each year. The proposed regulations are attempting to get automotive stakeholders to switch to asbestos-free ceramic brake pads or ones that use synthetic fibres.

“Assuming that there is a $5 incremental difference in price between brake pads containing asbestos and asbestos-free brake pads, it is expected that the automotive industry would carry operating costs of approximately $21 million over the time frame of analysis,” says a government report, as quoted in the TireBusiness.com article.

If it seems like we’re growing impatient, you’re right!

Quite frankly, there really is no reason for Canada to delay its asbestos ban any further. In the meantime, the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team remains dedicated to helping Canadians to remove asbestos from their homes and places of work. For information about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services, please call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

Federal Government Announces New Rules And Regulations Regarding Asbestos

It should come as no surprise to readers of the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. Blog to know that we are paying pretty close attention to the forthcoming nationwide ban of asbestos. Announced by the federal government, back in December of 2016, the comprehensive ban of the toxic material has been a long time coming. Scheduled for 2018, the ban is yet to be announced as having taken full effect.

Late last week, The Canadian Press offered some insight as to when Canadians can expect the ban to officially and finally come to pass. An article courtesy of CanadianBusiness.com revealed that “the federal government has laid out a tough set of proposed new regulations to prohibit the use, sale, import and export of asbestos and products that contain it, as well as the manufacture of products containing the cancer-causing mineral.”

The rules and regulations are currently undergoing an examination period which is to last until March 22nd.

During this time, which is being called a “comment period”, the federal government is asking the public and the industry for feedback. According to the article, the proposed amendments are designed to ensure that there is no market for asbestos and its related products in Canada.

“Asbestos is a carcinogen that has been condemned by the World Health Organization and is banned in about 50 countries around the world,” The Canadian Press reminds us, “Asbestos was mined in Canada until 2011 and was used mainly for insulating buildings and homes, as well as for fireproofing. Many uses have been phased out, but asbestos may still be found in a variety of products, including cement pipes, industrial furnaces and heating systems, building insulation, automotive brake pads and clutches.”

Under the new set of rules, the use or sale of any asbestos-containing products that currently exist in inventories across Canada, but have not yet been installed, would be prohibited. The regulations also stipulate that any asbestos-related materials that are currently stockpiled would have to be disposed of or destroyed.

There are exceptions to the new rules.

The Canadian Press article does note, however, that there are some exceptions to the new rules and regulations regarding asbestos. The material happens to be used in the chlor-alkali industry as part of cell diaphragms that are used as filters in the manufacture of chlorine and caustic soda. That application will be exempted from the ban until 2025. The idea is that it will give the industry time to phase out the existing systems.

“The clean-up of millions of tonnes of asbestos residue around former mine sites will also be exempt from the regulations, to allow for the use of the material in redevelopment of the areas,” the article also informs, “Scientists would still be allowed to study asbestos under another exemption and asbestos or objects containing asbestos could still be imported for display in a museum.”

As mentioned, the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team has made it no secret that it very much looks forward to the official launch of Canada’s asbestos ban. It also remains very dedicated to helping Canadians to eradicate the presence of asbestos from their homes and places of work. For information about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services, please call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

Asbestos Found In Claire’s Makeup Products

Happy New Year everyone! It’s officially 2018! And for those of you who have been following the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. Blog for the past year, you know how excited we are about the changing of the calendar. 2018 marks the year when Canada finally bans asbestos for good! We have extensively covered the news of our nation’s ban since it was first announced a little over a year ago. We now patiently wait for the day when the ban becomes official.

Make no mistake about it. Asbestos is deadly.

It is a known cause of mesothelioma and other forms of lung cancer and is the culprit behind thousands of workplace-related deaths in Canada each and every year. Formerly used as an insulation material in the construction of homes and office buildings, asbestos is still imported as parts of such products as brake pads for cars.

However, in a story that was published shortly before the new year, makeup users learned that the products they’re using on their faces may also contain the toxic material. According to Kate Sheridan on Newsweek.com, some makeup products that are sold at Claire’s are tainted with asbestos. This news stemmed from a report from WJAR which is an NBC affiliate station based in Rhode Island.

“The issue was discovered after a woman sent the makeup away for tests before her 6-year-old daughter used it,” reports Sheridan, “The woman, Kristi Warner, works at a law firm that specializes in asbestos lawsuits. Nine potentially affected products are currently listed on Claire’s website…The company states on its website that it will offer refunds to customers who return the products while the investigation is ongoing.”

She goes on to inform that testing found millions of asbestos pieces in the Claire’s makeup samples. With more than 1,600 stores in North America, one can only imagine how many individuals have been impacted by the company’s hazardous makeup products. Sean Fitzgerald of the Scientific Analytical Institute in North Carolina tested 24 samples from 17 products purchased in nine different cities.

“Every time we tested, in every Claire’s product that contains a talc-based cosmetic, we found tremolite asbestos,” he is quoted as saying in Sheridan’s article. He points out that talc-based products are particularly susceptible to being contaminated with asbestos because of the way talc and asbestos form in the earth. “Talc minerals and asbestos-forming minerals are related. They’re both magnesium silicates,” he adds.

The article doesn’t make mention of any customer complaints related to Claire’s products.

One can only imagine the impact of asbestos-laden makeup used on a person’s face. As Sheridan mentions, “Asbestos-related diseases usually affect people who are exposed to it through their job; the risk is especially high if a person is exposed over a long period of time.” As of her article’s writing, an investigation is ongoing.

As we’ve made no secret, the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team takes the issue of asbestos very seriously. If you have any concerns about the possibility of asbestos being present in your home, please don’t hesitate to contact us and ask us about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services. Call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

Helping You To Make 2018 Your Healthiest Year Yet!

We’re only five days away from Christmas! It’s hard to believe that it’s that time of year already. From everyone here, at DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. we’d like to wish each and every one of you a very Merry Christmas! We’d also like to wish everyone a very Happy Hanukkah and Happy Kwanzaa as well! Our great nation of Canada is home to many different people all celebrating various special occasions at this time of year. We hope they are all joyous for everyone.

Our team would also like to thank each and every one of our clients. With your help, we enjoyed a great 2017 and we look forward to an even better 2018. In order to make that happen, we need to work on getting you all healthier! In other words, our business simply isn’t successful if our clients aren’t enjoying better lives thanks to improved indoor air quality in their homes and places of business.

How can DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. help you to have a healthier 2018?

We offer numerous services that work to detect air pollutants in the places where you live and work so that you can breathe cleaner air. Just one of those services is our Mould Assessment Services. They include visual inspections for sources of mould, analytical sampling for source and health impact potential from spore exposure, moisture analysis and thermal scanning.

It’s important to be on the lookout for signs that you may have a mould problem. They include the onset of such symptoms as runny nose, sneezing, nasal congestion, watery eyes, skin rash or itching, flu-like symptoms, asthma attacks, memory problems, constant headaches and possible fever. To prevent mould from growing in your home or place of business, it’s important to limit the amount of moisture and humidity contained within.

“Look for damp spots in your house,” advises Canada.ca on its list of prevention tips, “Check basements, closets, window sills, roofs, and around sinks, tubs and pipes. Fix damp spots right away. Repair any water leaks as soon as you notice them. Clean up immediately after any flood. Use fans. Use kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans when cooking or showering. Let the fan run for a few minutes after you are done.”

We’re also working on making asbestos a thing of the past!

In 2018, Canada will finally implement its nationwide ban on the toxic material. However, a lot of work will still need to be done to protect Canadians from its harmful effects. Properties built before 1990 used asbestos for insulation purposes in walls, ceilings, floors and attics. It was also used for wrapping materials for ducts, furnaces, pipes and electrical wiring.

Sadly, asbestos is a known killer, causing the most occupational deaths in Canada each year. No province is immune. As Jeff Cottrill informs us on OHSCanada.com, “asbestos-related disease remains the top cause of occupational fatalities in British Columbia, with 584 workers in the province having lost their lives to asbestos-related illness from 2006 to 2015, according to WorkSafeBC, which launched an asbestos awareness campaign last fall.”

Let’s work together on making 2018 your healthiest year yet!

For more information about any and all of our services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca. Happy holidays!

One Comment

  1. Michael LaFrance-Reply
    January 7, 2018 at 8:55 pm

    Wanting a quote for services. Our house has had water entering through the basement floor boards by way of cracks in the foundation / weeping tile. Air quality testing and inspection for mold is required

Leave A Comment

Brazil Joins Canada In Implementing Ban Of Asbestos

2018 is right around the corner. And it’s set to be a wonderful year for Canadians. It will be the year when our nation finally bans asbestos completely. According to Matt Mauney on Asbestos.com, Canada was once considered a world leader in asbestos production. However, the toxic material is the leading cause of occupational deaths in our country. Thankfully, other nations are catching on. Canada is now joined by Ukraine, Moldova and most recently Brazil as countries who have declared a ban asbestos for good.

“The world’s third-largest producer of chrysotile asbestos, also known as white asbestos, ruled last week to ban the production, distribution and use of the toxic mineral,” Mauney reports in a December 4th article, “Brazil’s Supreme Court on Nov. 29 voted 7 to 2 on the measure to ban the substance responsible for deadly mesothelioma and other diseases.”

Brazil’s asbestos ban is quite the monumental one.

It officially makes the nation the most populous one in the world to ban the hazardous material. According to the International Ban Asbestos Secretariat (IBAS), informs Mauney, China, India and the United States – nations with populations larger than Brazil – still use chrysotile in some capacity.

The Brazilian ban, however, is huge for entirely different reason. The South American nation stands to lose a major revenue stream considering that approximately 95 percent of the raw chrysotile asbestos that is imported into the United States comes from Brazil. According to a 2017 study from the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. imported 340 metric tons of the toxic material last year.

Fernanda Giannasi is the advisor to Brazil’s Association of the Asbestos-Exposed. In a statement to BBC Brazil, she communicated a hope for seeing other countries following suit. “This decision will have a global impact on the market. It will create a domino effect,” she is quoted as saying, “If an asbestos-producing country like Brazil is capable of making such a decision, why wouldn’t it be followed by those countries that buy asbestos?”

The U.S. is yet to be on board.

As it stands, Brazil and Canada are now two out of 62 countries that have banned asbestos. For some reason, the United States continues to not be one of them. “The U.S. remains one of the few industrialized countries without a ban or phase-out plan in place,” writes Mauney, “Of the 10 most populous countries in the world, only Brazil and Japan have passed comprehensive legislation to ban asbestos. Roughly 10,000 Americans die each year from preventable asbestos-related diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma.”

It is assumed, however, that instead of joining the 62 other nations in banning asbestos, the United States will turn to Russia to import the material. Russia, explains Mauney, has long been a world leader in asbestos mine production – to the tune of 1.1 million metric tons each year. That’s more than half of the world total! It trails only China in being the world’s top consumer of asbestos products as well.

The team, here at DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. applauds Brazil’s wise decision to ban asbestos. And as far as we’re concerned, the new year can’t come soon enough. We look forward to an asbestos-free Canada. We know, however, that many in our nation are still impacted by asbestos. For information about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment