DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd.
Indoor Air Quality and Environmental Experts

855-668-3131
inquiries@dftechnical.ca
"

3 Best Practices For Keeping Your Home Clean All Autumn Long

Over the past couple of weeks, our blog has been doling out summer-based cleaning ideas. Admittedly, our last two blogs were partly posted in an attempt to continue to celebrate the summer and elongate it in our own unique way. Alas, we have absolutely no control over time and here we are, in the last week of August. Sadly, summer is about to end. Next week, school will open and summer vacation will officially be over.

We suppose that today is as good a day as any to offer up some suggestions for keeping your home clean all autumn long. After all, the fall is almost here!

Here are three best practices:

1. Clean those oft-forgotten areas of the home.

How often do you move your furniture away from the wall so that you can vacuum behind it? Our desks, beds, night tables and chests of drawers are often kept in place all year round. What that means is you have dust collecting in abundance. Do yourself a favour and start cleaning the areas of your home that rarely see a vacuum, broom or mop. On QuickAndDirtyTips.com, Bruce and Jeanne Lubin remind us that chandeliers are rarely ever cleaned.

They offer a very unique cleaning strategy. “First, make sure the light switch is off,” they instruct, “Next, lay a blanket or upside-down umbrella underneath the chandelier to catch any drips or falling pieces. Now mix 1/2 cup lemon juice with 1½ cups water in a jar. The crystals clean themselves—all you have to do is bring the jar up to each one and dip it in, then let it air-dry.”

2. Start a winter wipe down.

Yes, we know that autumn hasn’t even begun yet. But your fall cleaning routine needs to incorporate methods of ensuring that the forthcoming winter is one when your home offers you the purest air to breathe. Doing that requires what HouseBeautiful.com calls a “winter wipe down”.

“To prevent winter bugs being passed via germ-ridden hands, ensure that all surfaces are properly cleaned with an anti-bacterial cleaning fluid…going further than focusing on kitchen and bathroom surfaces,” recommends the site, “For example, if a door is being regularly used it’s likely to pick up all sorts of germs that can easily pass through body contact. This is especially important if children are around.”

3. Throw orange peels in the fireplace.

We know this may sound like a weird suggestion. Firstly, we admit that it is less of a cleaning technique and more of a way to maintain high indoor air quality during the colder months of the year. In the past, we have championed the cause of ignoring your fireplace because burning firewood emits several toxic compounds into the air. As the Lubins reveal, orange peels are much healthier alternatives to firewood.

“The best thing to use as kindling in your fireplace isn’t newspaper (or printed out emails from your ex),” they write, “It’s orange peels! Orange (and lemon) peels smell delicious when they burn, and they contain oils that not only make them burn longer, but help ignite the wood around them. Finally, they produce less creosote than paper, which will help keep your chimney clean.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we’d like to offer you and your family the gift of clean air inside your home this fall. For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

*

Keeping Your Home Clean All Summer For Easy Breathing

We know what you’re thinking. The summer will soon be over. Well, if you’re like most Canadians, that thought is quite harrowing. So, we’d prefer to see things a little differently. We still have two more weeks to enjoy the summer! Yes, we know that the official end of the season, this year, comes on September 23rd. But, for many people, summer comes to a close the day school starts. Enjoy it while you can!

One way to ensure that you enjoy the rest of summer is to take steps in maintaining your health. No one likes being sick. And being sick during the summertime is the absolute worst! Believe it or not, you are taking great steps towards living illness-free during the warmest month of the year when you keep your home clean. Adhering to simple, everyday cleanup routines is an excellent way to rid your home of pollutants and other respiratory system irritants.

For example, in last week’s blog, we highlighted the need to stop using chemical-based cleansers. Doing so will help you to avoid eye and nose irritation, headaches, dizziness, vomiting and the worsening of asthma symptoms. So what are the best ways to keep your home clean all summer?

Vacuum regularly.

The summertime encourages us all to go outside more often. And that’s great! We all need fresh air and the vitamin D provided to us by the sun. However, the more we go outside, the more dirt that accumulates on our shoes to bring home with us. Naturally, it’s important to stick to the Canadian tradition of removing your shoes before entering the living spaces of your home. However, there is still bound to be dirt on your floor. Be sure to vacuum it regularly.

According to New Jersey’s Air Group, “a vacuum is your friend. You can use a vacuum to suck up a lot of the dirt, debris, and dust that builds in and around your appliances before it blows out into the air. Also remember to change all filters regularly. You can also schedule to have your ducts cleaned. This doesn’t need to be done very often, but if you haven’t had it done since you’ve been in your home, it’s a good idea to check into it.”

Change your air filters.

We understand if you like to use your air conditioner. Some people just aren’t into the heat and humidity that summer brings along. If so, remember that you are utilizing a system that blows air throughout your home. That systems needs to be maintained so as to minimize that amount of dust and other pollutants that are being blown around your residence. Check on your air filters and change them whenever necessary.

According to Lorry on EBlogin.com, air filters should be changed every month. “Your air filter is an effective tool that protects your home from indoor air pollutants and allergens,” she explains, “In addition, proper ventilation in your home can maintain optimal air quality. Check the vent fans in your bathroom and kitchen areas to ensure that they are working at optimal levels.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we’re committed to helping you enjoy high indoor air quality in your home all summer. For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

3 Ways To Keep Indoor Air Quality As High As Possible All Summer

For most people, enjoying the summer means spending as much time out and about in the sun as possible. And, for others, it means taking the opportunity to relax and unwind at home. For those who enjoy the comforts of their own homes, it’s important to note that the quality of the air you breathe should be kept at the highest level possible all summer.

Here are three ways to do that:

1. Keep the windows cracked.

Canadians have an interesting problem and an even more interesting way of dealing with it. The winters are too cold. So we shut the windows and turn up the heat. Our summers tend to get pretty hot. So we shut the windows and turn on the air conditioner. No matter the season, to better your indoor air quality, it’s best to crack open those windows and allow the air from outside to circulate with the air from inside.

New Jersey’s Air Group explains just how important it is to ventilate your home. “Most HVAC systems do not automatically bring fresh air in, so remember to crack a window or invest in a filtration systems,” advises their website, “Try to never use any chemical household products in spaces without ventilation. For instance, if you’re cleaning the bathroom, if you can’t open a window, at least turn on the fan.” 

2. Pay close attention to humidity levels.

When it gets hot and humid, it can certainly make for uncomfortable conditions. However, humidity can also present your home with some mould and mildew issues. Remember that the presence of humidity involves the presence of moisture. When moisture accumulates on the surfaces within your home, it can create breeding grounds for mould and mildew. Be sure to check the humidity levels in your area each day.

“The most humid parts of most homes are the basements, attics, crawlspaces, and closets,” warns Minnesota’s Blue Ox Heating & Air, “Check these parts of your home for signs of humidity like condensation, mould growth, dust accumulation, and wet air. The best way to quickly protect against humidity is by fixing cracks and gaps in your home’s insulation and investing in a dehumidifier.”

3. Avoid chemical-based cleansers.

This is a tip we’ve provided on numerous occasions throughout the history of our blog. We’re willing to bet this won’t be the last time we offer it, as well. Cleaning products with fresh scents are all the rage. But they shouldn’t be. We know that a pleasant smell usually connotes cleanliness. But it doesn’t. Such products are riddled with volatile organic compounds, also known as VOCs. They can cause numerous health issues including headaches and nausea.

“Keep in mind; those lemon or pine scented sprays that we use to clean the kitchen and bathroom smell nice but they are spraying chemicals into the air,” informs Lorry on EBlogin.com, “Examples of these products are fabric softeners, laundry detergents, dryer sheets and air fresheners. Chemicals in these products have been known to cause a variety of health concerns in humans when they are inhaled.”

At DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd., we’re committed to helping you enjoy high indoor air quality in your home all summer. For information about our Air Quality Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment

What Other Diseases Are Directly Caused By Asbestos Exposure?

In last week’s blog, we revisited the scary, but necessary-to-address topic of asbestos and highlighted some of the types of cancer the toxic substance is known to cause. Among them are lung cancer, ovarian cancer and laryngeal cancer.

Banned from Canada back in December of 2018, asbestos is still present in many homes, offices, schools and other buildings across the country. Avoiding exposure to its fibres is absolutely mandatory for preserving optimum health. Once inhaled, they can cause serious damage.

In addition to the cancers listed in last week’s blog, there are many other diseases that are directly caused by asbestos exposure. We feel it’s important to expose you to this information this week.

Asbestosis.

As its name clearly gives away, asbestosis is a disease that is directly caused by asbestos exposure. Sufferers often require both oxygen tanks and pain medication in order to control their symptoms. Sadly, as Michelle Whitmer explains on Asbestos.com, there is no cure for asbestosis and its progression can’t be halted.

“Asbestosis is a progressive pulmonary disease that inhibits lung health and function,” she writes, “It develops when inhaled asbestos fibres accumulate in the lungs and cause scar tissue to form. Over time the scar tissue hardens the lungs, limiting elasticity. Breathing becomes difficult and painful as the condition progresses. Scarring impairs the lungs’ ability to supply oxygen to the blood stream.”

Mesothelioma.

Mesothelioma is a deadly form of lung cancer that takes the form of a malignant tumour in the lining of the lungs, abdomen or heart. It is directly caused by the inhalation of asbestos fibres. Symptoms include shortness of breath and chest pain, and tragically, those diagnosed with mesothelioma are often given up to one more year to live.

As explained by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, “Mesothelioma, is a rare cancer of the membrane that covers the lungs and chest cavity (pleura), the membrane lining the abdominal cavity (peritoneum), or membranes surrounding other internal organs. Signs of mesothelioma may not appear until 30 to 40 years after exposure to asbestos.”

Clubbed fingers.

This one may come as a surprise to you. Apparently, asbestos-related diseases can cause clubbed fingers to form. Sufferers of asbestosis are especially at risk of getting clubbed fingers. According to Whitmer, they develop early and don’t go away once they are developed. Clubbed fingers are often signs that a person has a particularly severe case of asbestosis.

“About half of all people with severe asbestosis develop a condition known as clubbed fingers,” Whitmer informs us, “The tips of fingers become misshapen, swollen and may take on a box-like appearance. The condition appears to be caused by the biological effects of asbestosis rather than directly by asbestos fibres.”

As we pointed out in last week’s blog, the DF Technical & Consulting Services Ltd. team remains dedicated to helping Canadians avoid the tragic outcomes that asbestos is known to cause. For information about our Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) Services, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-855-668-3131 or email info@dftechnical.ca.

Leave A Comment